Focus on Technology

Cincinnati VA

COVID-19 has kicked the use of telehealth into high gear. Kaiser Health News reports the Cleveland Clinic logged 60,000 such visits in March, up from an average of 3,400. For some hospital systems, like the Cincinnati VA Medical Center, telehealth success is the result of years of planning and use.

coronavirus vaccine
Jessica Hill / AP

Pharmaceutical companies are working around the clock to repurpose current medications and develop new therapies and vaccines to treat and prevent COVID-19. During a on-the-record discussion with reporters March 18, the life sciences industry detailed some of their most promising efforts.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Mary Bradburn's class at Batavia Middle School is getting pretty good at building future cities. For the third time since her class first entered the Future City Competition, it won Ohio and moved on to nationals. This year the class focused on making sure people have clean drinking water when faced with a hurricane.

Steven Senne/AP

Health officials say figuring out the path of the coronavirus is key to controlling it. They have employed the help of spies, data scientists, epidemiologists and others to study who is likely to get COVID-19 and where it will travel next.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

You're right to be cautious about the sun. It can cause skin cancer, damage your eyes and make you look older. But with the right protection, getting at least 30 minutes of it a day may prevent Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome - which increases the risk of heart disease and certain types of cancer, according to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center researchers.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Research shows South Asians are four times more likely to develop heart disease than the rest of the population. One University of Cincinnati scientist is moving beyond genetics to talk about risk and prevention.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cosmetic procedures are becoming more mainstream thanks in part to the increasing urge to take "digitally enhanced" selfies. In 2018, Americans spent $16.5 billion on such procedures, out of pocket, with no insurance.

Courtesy of Procter & Gamble

Visitors to this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas were wowed by Procter & Gamble's beauty and bathroom technology.

Courtesy of Washington State University

It's no secret that road salt is not very sustainable. So, states like Ohio are looking for greener alternatives. It is using so-called "BEET HEET," a de-icer made with the vegetable.  A Washington State University professor is proving grape extract and other agricultural waste can be used. Research shows it melts ice faster and causes significantly less damage to concrete and asphalt than traditional methods.

Courtesy of Patriot One Technolgies

At Great American Ball Park, technology inside a couple of unobtrusive planters use artificial intelligence and magnets to make sure people coming inside don't have weapons or explosive devices. Ginter Electric, a Patriot One Technologies dealer, installed the system and is partnering with the Cincinnati Reds.  Ginter's T. J. Dooley is looking to sign up businesses, governments and schools.

Ann Thompson

Robots may be helping to grow your salad greens. WVXU first told you about 80 Acres Farms when it had a single location in Spring Grove Village. Now it's expanded to Hamilton and is intent on helping others recreate its indoor robotic farming.

Courtesy of Cincinnati Children's

A serious lung complication for a small group of juvenile arthritis patients is causing concern for both Cincinnati Children's Hospital researchers and the families of patients.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A University of Dayton student and Cincinnati Country Day graduate has come up with a way to make cerebral palsy patients comfortable and safe while they sleep.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Psilocybin, a key ingredient in hallucinogenic magic mushrooms, is time consuming and expensive to make. That could be a problem when producing it as a drug to treat depression and addiction. Miami University researchers have apparently figured out a way to make psychedelic drugs faster and cheaper.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

More than a year ago, Shepherd Chemical, a fourth-generation family-owned manufacturer of specialty chemicals, started feeling the heat from China. But after making a few changes that didn't cost anything, it cut its production time by more than half. Now it's selling its products in Asia.

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Atsuo Sasaki, Ph.D., associate professor at the UC College of Medicine, says there's an FDA-approved drug that can shrink brain and other types of inoperable cancer in animal models by targeting the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells.

Courtesy of Tengai

How would you feel about a robot interviewing you for a job? Swedish company Tengai is working on an English version of its robot which it claims will ask you questions without biases. Other companies, like HireVue and Humantic, formerly DeepSense, dig for personality traits based on digital interviews and social media accounts.

Vincent Walter / Purdue University

Purdue University has installed the first all-digital nuclear reactor system in the United States. Scientists say the technology will allow for more data analysis which will make plants safer.

Clovernook
Ann Thompson / WVXU

Advances in printing technology are breaking down barriers for the blind and visually impaired. Researchers in India have created software to display images, text and audio stories side by side. That has the potential to cut printing costs by 90%. New printers at Cincinnati's Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired are also able to cut costs because they decrease the amount of time workers must spend hand-creating images.

Courtesy of Mercer University

Behind the scenes of world conflict are scientists solving problems on behalf of human rights organizations. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has a program called On-call Scientist and it's still going strong after decades of success.

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