Health

Ron Pack

When it comes to a particular type of stroke, new research suggests younger black or Latino people may experience better outcomes than whites.

A wide range of healthcare issues drew headlines in 2019, affecting the lives of millions of Americans. Here are some highlights from Side Effects Public Media's coverage across the Midwest:

Vaping. In the second half of the year, this crisis exploded onto America's consciousness. 

The Christmas weather has been mostly mild this year but many Ohioans are still getting the chills. Public health leaders say the flu has hit the Buckeye State hard.

As vaping has grown more popular in recent years, the trend has been fueled by the habit's pleasurable allure: Compared with smoking cigarettes or pot, vaping is discreet and less smelly. Vaping fluids come in hundreds of flavors. There's no tar or other byproducts of burning. And vape pens are high-tech, customizable and sleek.

Ohio lawmakers are proposing a bill that would eliminate an insurance provision known as "step therapy" for people diagnosed with Stage IV cancer.

Courtesy of Center for Closing the Health Gap

Black women have the highest mortality rates when it comes to a lot of diseases despite in some cases being less likely to have those diseases in the first place. Research shows stress and race play a key role in affecting outcomes. The Center for Closing the Health Gap is starting a movement to reduce those numbers.

Courtesy of Cincinnati Children's

A serious lung complication for a small group of juvenile arthritis patients is causing concern for both Cincinnati Children's Hospital researchers and the families of patients.

Courtesy of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

A Cincinnati Children's researcher is one of this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators, receiving a $1.5 million, three-year grant from the foundation of Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen.

Ohio kindergarten vaccination rates from the 2018-2019 school year are less than the national average, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

feminine products
Rich Pedroncelli / AP

Some Cincinnati community organizers are hosting a rally this weekend to destigmatize menstrual cycles and push for better access to feminine products.

masculinity
Pixabay

Between rising rates of suicide, depression and men simply dropping out of the workforce, are American men facing a crisis of masculinity?

The top doctor in state government said she’s concerned about one of at least three bills in the Ohio legislature that opponents say have some dubious medical science behind them.

A national report ranks Ohio in the bottom half in the country for the health of women, infants and children.

architecture
Pixabay

Architecture and the built environment effect our lives every day, says American Institute of Architects Cincinnati Executive Director Julie Carpenter. Buildings are places where we live, work and play. Carpenter says there is an increased interest in design that promotes health and an improved quality of life. That is the focus of the AIA Ohio Valley Regional conference Sept. 19-21.

fifth third vigil
Jennifer Merritt / WVXU

This week marks the one-year memorial of the shooting at the Fifth Third Center in downtown Cincinnati.

After the events on Sept. 6, 2018, #CincyStrong became a trending topic locally and a rallying force for the city to get behind. Though Cincinnati has not experienced a mass shooting since (defined by the FBI as four or more murdered during an event), gun violence continues in the city. In urban communities like the West End, the conversation around it continues.

http://vaping360.com/what-is-vaping/ / commons.wikimedia.org, available for use

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) is confirming three reports of severe pulmonary illness are likely caused by vaping and it is investigating 11 more suspected cases. That's up from six suspected cases the agency reported less than two weeks ago.

Holmes County is a patchwork of farmland. Modest houses perch on sloping hills and laundry hangs from clothes lines, flapping in the wind.

onesight luxottica
Courtesty of OneSight

One in seven people worldwide lacks access to vision care, and one in four children in the U.S. has an undiagnosed vision problem.

A new report from the Ohio Environmental Council and Policy Matters Ohio says climate change has significant negative impacts on children's health, which they say highlights the urgency to reduce carbon emissions. 

provided

Atsuo Sasaki, Ph.D., associate professor at the UC College of Medicine, says there's an FDA-approved drug that can shrink brain and other types of inoperable cancer in animal models by targeting the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells.

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