People's Liberty

Provided: People's Liberty

A former Cincinnati Public Schools board member is hoping to educate future board members. Elisa Hoffman says there are lots of groups focused on recruiting political candidates, but not many efforts to make people effective once they're in office. Hoffman's created a course she says will fill the gap.

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IDEALAB: Movement Makers is a day-long event where those who want to make a difference in their communities can learn how to harness their passion and translate their ideas into real, substantial positive change.

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Cincinnati Music Accelerator, which calls itself Ohio’s first career accelerator program for musicians and recording artists, graduated its first class this fall. Program Founder Kick Lee knows firsthand how cut-throat the recording industry can be. That's why the accelerator arms musicians and recording artists with business savvy. In the six-week course they learn to monetize their talents and license their creative work. Lee launched the first session this summer with a grant from People's Liberty and the second session begins this November.

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Tracey Brumfield knows how hard it is to access information in jail. She spent time behind bars. Now she's publishing a newspaper. As the People's Liberty 2017 Haile Fellow, Brumfield created RISE, the first-ever newspaper to circulate in the Hamilton County Justice Center.

Lisa Andrews

Brightly painted, repurposed newspaper boxes are popping up all over Cincinnati. Inside you won't find papers but non-perishable items for anyone in need. Lisa Andrews started her first tiny food bank called the "People's Pantry Cincy" in Pleasant Ridge. With a grant from People's Liberty, Andrews is branching out to 10 local neighborhoods, including Walnut Hills. The recent closing of Kroger has created a food desert in that community.

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The philanthropic lab People’s Liberty has announced the 2017 winners of its $100,000 Haile Fellowship grants. The grant challenges two individuals to develop and implement a big idea that could have a positive impact on Greater Cincinnati.

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Throughout Cincinnati, residents, community leaders and organizations are working to improve conditions in their neighborhoods. 

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People's Liberty provides funding and mentoring to local civic-minded artists, entrepreneurs and activists so they can turn their ideas to bring positive changes to Cincinnati into reality.

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Last month, People's Liberty announced its latest group of grant recipients. Each of the eight grantees receives $10,000 to make a positive impact on their communities. Projects range from Brick Gardens, an urban gardening model using indoor vertical towers to grow produce, to The Costumed Sidewalk Parades, spontaneous theme-based parades inviting people to explore new parts of the city.

Nina Wells (ninamdot), kingme2016.net

People’'s Liberty Globe Grantee Nina Wells (ninamdot) unveils her installation, King Me, in People’'s Liberty’'s storefront gallery this Friday evening.

Provided / Brad Cooper/People's Liberty

People’s Liberty, for the second year in a row, is taking applications this month for two Haile Fellows. They are awarded $100,000 each to improve the city. One of last year’s grantees is using the money to build two tiny houses in Over-the-Rhine. They are fewer than 300 square feet — about the size of some master bedrooms — and are meant to increase affordable living, but are quite a change from the norm.

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An outdoor public history exhibition, Look Here!, now on display in Over the Rhine uses dozens of historic photographs to tell the neighborhood’'s story. The photographs, which are mounted at sites throughout OTR, depict scenes dating from the late nineteenth century through the 1940's. The project was funded by a People'’s Liberty grant.

http://cincymap.org/rtv4/

  

What if there was a way to make waiting for the bus a lot easier? Metro*Now, a People’'s Liberty grant project, does this by utilizing off-the-shelf hardware and open source software. Using a tablet display, you just click on any bus stop and see buses arriving at that selected stop in real-time.

The application period for the $100,000 Haile Fellowships closes tomorrow, October 1. The Fellowships, awarded annually to two Greater Cincinnati-based innovators who have bold plans to address local challenges, are part of an ongoing effort by People’'s Liberty to find and foster individuals with creative ideas to better our community.

Today when Greater Cincinnati movie-goers want to catch a feature film they can head to one of the local multiplexes, a smaller art-house theater or even an IMAX. Or they can just stream a movie to their flat-screen TV or smart device. But there was a time when seeing a movie in Cincinnati meant a trip to the Albee, the Shubert, or one of the other dozen-plus theaters downtown, or to one of the suburban movie houses like the Covedale, the Mount Lookout Cinema, or the 20th Century in Oakley.

Local artist and filmmaker C. Jacqueline Wood received a Globe Grant from People’s Liberty to create a unique installation in their new headquarters, the former Globe Furniture building in OTR.

People'’s Liberty awards Globe Grants three times a year to individuals ready to transform the People's Liberty Elm Street storefront into pop-up experiences and bold installations.

  Last December People’s Liberty named Brad Cooper as one of its 2015 Haile Fellows, and awarded him $100,000 to develop his plan to build two, 200-square-foot houses in Cincinnati. Many people and community planners look at small, or tiny, houses as affordable, environmentally-friendly alternatives to traditional house designs. 

One of the People’s Liberty’s 2015 Haile Fellowship winners, Brad Schnittger, is the founder of MusicLi, an online library of published original music from the Greater Cincinnati area that can be licensed for various commercial uses

People's Liberty announces smaller grant winners

Apr 24, 2015
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Friday is signing day at People's Liberty for project grant winners.  Eight recipients of the $10,000 grants will be introduced as they present their ideas for making the region a better place to live.

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