Seinfeld

Courtesy MTM

Sparky Anderson got fired in Cincinnati – again – as a sportscaster for WKRP In Cincinnati.

Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench switched uniforms in winter of 1971 – after winning the 1970 National League Most Valuable Player award – to play a military guard on TV's Mission: Impossible.

With the 2020 baseball season on hold – and everyone stuck at home watching TV – it's a good time for a lineup of big league players in prime-time roles on Mister Ed, Cheers, Bewitched, Everybody Loves Raymond and other TV hits.

Courtesy of Chip Chinery

Anderson Township native Chip Chinery makes a brief appearance on The Conners Tuesday night as a resident of Landford.

Courtesy NBC

For "a show about nothing," Seinfeld definitely gave us plenty: Close talkers, low talkers, regifters, Festivus, snacking double-dippers, the Soup Nazi, puffy shirts and the Manssiere support undergarment for men – not that there's anything wrong with that.

Courtesy CBS

Want to spend Christmas with your old TV friends?

Here's my guide to classic Christmas episodes with Ross, Rachel, Monica, Joey, Phoebe, Lucy, Seinfeld, Sheldon and Dr. Bob Hartley and Dr. Johnny Fever.

NBCUniversal

Why do Jimmy Fallon and Conan O'Brien do fewer President Trump jokes than Stephen Colbert or Seth Meyers? Why aren't some late-night TV hosts very political?

John Kiesewetter

"How Late Night TV Made Fun Of Washington D.C. This Year"... That's the topic for former NBC executive Rick Ludwin's annual talk to Miami University students on Thursday, Oct. 19.

Chip Chinery

What do TV's top-rated drama "NCIS," the new Billy Jean King-Bobby Riggs "Battle of the Sexes" movie, ABC's "Speechless" and Fox's "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" have in common?

Chip Chinery.

The St. Xavier High School (1982) and Miami University (1986) graduate is enjoying his biggest fall of his Hollywood career.

Courtesy NBCUniversal

Never mind! NBC has canceled plans to revive its Thursday night "Must See TV" branding.

In May, NBC announced that the "Will & Grace" remake would anchor a "Must See TV" revival – the slogan  goes back to "Cheers," "Seinfeld" and "ER" in the 1980s and '90s – with Tina Fey's "Great News" newsroom comedy at 8:30 p.m., the critically acclaimed "This Is Us" at 9 p.m. and Dick Wolf's latest, "Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders" at 10 p.m.

ABC Television

It's a Festivus for the rest of us this weekend, with classic holiday episodes of "Seinfeld," "The Brady Bunch," "A Very Brady Christmas" and Perry Como's variety show.

"Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas," Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,"  "Frosty the Snowman," "Frosty Returns" and "The Elf on a Shelf" also repeat.

Cincinnati Pops

Tony-winner and former “Seinfeld” star Jason Alexander hasn’t given up on TV. Despite two sitcom failures since “Seinfeld” – ABC’s “Bob Patterson” (2001) and CBS’ “Listen Up” (2004-05), Alexander says he’s preparing to pitch TV programmers another TV series.

“We’re taking a series idea out (soon)…. I think it would be great fun to have another one,” says Alexander, 55, who performs his favorite Broadway tunes with the Cincinnati Pops March 4-6 at Music Hall. Alexander won the Tony for best actor in a musical for “Jerome Robbins’ Broadway” in 1989, before NBC premiered “The Seinfeld Chronicles.”

When I interviewed Alexander about the Pops performance for WVXU-FM’s “Around Cincinnati,” to air at  7 p.m. Sunday, he told me about plans for another TV comeback.  He also talked about possibly directing a movie; teaching; directing an award-winning music video for Brad Paisely; and a theater production he wants to take to Broadway.


NBCUniversal

You’ll never watch Jimmy Fallon’s “Tonight Show” the same way after reading this column.

I always learn a lot about TV when former NBC late-night programming executive Rick Ludwin returns to speak to students at Miami University, his alma mater.

On Thursday night, he revealed NBC's camera tricks on Fallon’s top-rated “Tonight Show” to overcome limitations of cramped Studio 6B in New York’s Rockefeller Center – and a few other observations about Stephen Colbert and the changes in TV’s late-night landscape.

Courtesy WKRC-TV

Sheila Gray and Bob Herzog will be working longer starting Sept. 21, when WKRC-TV expands “Good Morning Cincinnati” to 7-9 a.m. on sister station WSTR-TV (Channel 64).

Gray, who jumped to WKRC-TV last year from WXIX-TV, will be competing longer with her old station. Channel 19 airs local news until 11 a.m. Channel 12’s morning show will air 4:30-9 a.m.

The expanded “Good Morning Cincinnati” premieres Sept. 21, the week most of the new fall TV prime-time series debut.

The majority of daytime changes start the week of Sept. 14, including WCPO-TV’s new 7 p.m. half-hour newscast.  See the list below.