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Keeping It Civil Even When The Topic Is Controversial

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Little is accomplished when conversations turn into shouting matches where no one is willing to listen to what's being said.

We see it on cable news shows and college campuses, in the workplace and even at family gatherings – what starts out as a simple conversation quickly devolves into a nasty confrontation, with people taking sides and everyone talking and no one listening.

As it becomes increasingly more difficult to hold even casual conversations without someone taking offense or being offensive, several organizations are working to facilitate a return to civil dialogue and meaningful discussions. 

Joining us to discuss how we can talk with and learn from each other about even the most controversial issues are Kentucky Campus Compact Executive Director Gayle Hilleke; former president of the National Issues Forums Institute (NIFI), Dr. William Muse; Dr. Burke Miller, associate professor of History at Northern Kentucky University; and Executive Director of The Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement at NKU, Mark Neikirk.

The 2018 Kentucky Engagement Conference, Civil Dialogue: Approaches and Application, will be held Friday, March 2, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., at Spalding University in Louisville. The event is sponsored by the Kentucky Campus Compact Network. For information and registration, click here.

The Northern Kentucky Forum is a collaboration of the Scripps Howard Center for Civic Engagement and Legacy, a young leaders group. The Forum's purpose is to foster civil, civic dialogue on topics of community interest.