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Cincinnati City Hall Security Being Reviewed Again

Cincinnati officials are once again reviewing security measures at City Hall. 
 
City Manager Harry Black told a council committee Monday a team of employees are looking over several recommendations.


"I don't ever want us to get to the point of having an incident and then Monday morning quarterbacking," Black said.  "If somebody has been hurt or if a life has been lost, I just don't want us to ever get to that point where we're reacting versus being proactive."
The list includes putting metal detectors at entrances, better screening of incoming mail and packages, and updating security cameras at various city buildings.

 
Council Member Yvette Simpson said the group should include people who use City Hall.
 
"People who are using this building on a regular basis (should) be able to weigh in on these recommendations," Simpson said.  "So that we make sure this is a building where people can continue to come and conduct business and where the public can have full access to their public officials and the administration.  They pay our salary."
 
Council Member Christopher Smitherman, who is chairman of Council's Law and Public Safety Committee, has been calling for a such a review for more than a year.
 
"The world is changing and whatever those security measures are, as long as they're common sense, we already know they're going to be inconvenient," Smitherman said.  "Because security and keeping people safe in its nature creates an inconvenience."
 
At one time, City Hall visitors had to pass through metal detectors when entering.  But they were removed ten years ago soon after Mark Mallory was elected mayor.
 
Black is promising to bring any proposals to city council before implementing them.

Jay Hanselman brings more than 10 years experience as a news anchor and reporter to 91.7 WVXU. He came to WVXU from WNKU, where he hosted the local broadcast of All Things Considered. Hanselman has been recognized for his reporting by the Kentucky AP Broadcasters Association, the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists, and the Ohio AP Broadcasters.