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United Way To Provide $9M In Funding To Area Agencies Struggling Due To Pandemic

children's home
Courtesy
/
Steven Wilson, The Children's Home
The Children’s Home opened a therapeutic and sensory friendly outdoor garden adjacent to its day treatment building on its main campus in 2020.";

The United Way of Greater Cincinnati this week announced $9 million in funding for local agencies. About 135 agencies are promised the funding starting in January 2022. Chief Strategy Officer Mike Baker says their partner agencies have struggled with limited resources and an increased need for service.

"We thought it was really important to put this funding out in the community and put the announcement out there early to let people know that there's going to be six months of funding that will take people through the end of next June to continue support for the great programs they're providing," Baker said.

Baker says the United Way had increased revenue last year, unlike most human services organizations. The agencies with funding for next year include groups in 10 counties across Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana.

The Children's Home serves about 14,000 children and their families with behavioral health and early childhood programs. COO Pam McKie says they were already struggling to maintain the same level of care for families. They will get about half-a-million dollars in the first half of next year.

"To get this advanced notice that this funding will remain intact does ensure that we do not have to worry about reducing anything," McKie said. "We just need to worry about strengthening and ensuring that the actions that we're taking meet the best results."

McKie says the funding commitment ensures they focus on a two-generational model of helping families: "On their basic needs, their financial stability, health and wellness, quality education and many other things to maintain their stability as they come out of the pandemic."