Debbie Holmes

Debbie Holmes began her career in broadcasting in Columbus after graduating from The Ohio State University. She left the Buckeye state to pursue a career in television news and worked as a reporter and anchor in Moline, Illinois and Memphis, Tennessee.

She returned to radio news after moving to Los Angeles and earned 2 Golden Mike awards for live news reporting. In 2002, she earned her MBA at Franklin University.

In September 2009, she returned to her career roots and started working part-time at WOSU News and in December 2010 began working full-time. She enjoys public broadcasting because it allows her to cover news stories in-depth. Debbie and her husband have two children.

A protest against police brutality in downtown Columbus turned violent on Thursday night. Protestors broke windows at the Ohio Statehouse and nearby businesses after a clash with Columbus Police officers. 

Around 400 people gathered at Broad and High streets to demonstrate over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. 

Across Ohio, public health departments are investigating the spread of COVID-19 with the help of contact tracers. These “disease detectives” are tasked with locating people who may have also contracted the coronavirus, but don't know it yet.

Franklin County has outlined a new process to ensure the rightful property owner will receive any excess money from a foreclosure. 

What once was a booming payday lending industry in Ohio has shrunk dramatically since the Short-Term Lender Law took effect in April.  Some companies have left the state, while others are changing their business model.

The Ohio State University will participate in a major public health initiative aimed at preventing cervical cancer in at-risk Appalachian families across several states. 

Discrepancies in sentencing among Ohio inmates inspired a recent documentary on the inequities of the U.S. justice system.

An Ohio native who designed the “Black Panther" movie set is a nominee in the 91st Academy Awards ceremony that takes place Sunday in Los Angeles.

Despite the opening of medical marijuana dispensaries in Ohio, many colleges and universities continue to ban any forms of medical marijuana on campus.

The year is winding down with much of the Ohio economy still humming, and some experts say 2019 could also bring good economic news to other parts of the state. Despite trends of job growth and lowering unemployment, the state still faces numerous challenges.

Ohioans are closer to getting new voting machines. Secretary of State Jon Husted has notified county boards of elections they can start the process of selecting new equipment. 

This is the second of a two-part story on the aftermath of ECOT's closure. Read part one here.

Beth Day, assistant principal of Washington High School, watches as students change classes in the main hallway. It’s a far cry from her nine years at the digital school ECOT.

This is the first of a two-part story on the aftermath of ECOT's closure. Read part two here.

In the lower level of her Canal Winchester home, Anna Aquino helps her children with their school lessons. Her older daughter, 17-year-old Isabella is back in traditional school at Canal Winchester High, while Aquino homeschools her younger daughter, Trinity, who's in 7th grade.