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Politics

One-Time Rivals Paul and Trump Find Common Ground on Foreign Policy

rand paul donald trump
Evan Vucci
/
AP
President Donald Trump stands with Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., during an event to sign an executive order on health care in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Oct. 12, 2017 in Washington.

While President Donald Trump has initiated a warming of relations with Russia, the same could be said for his relationship with Kentucky’s junior U.S. Senator.

Republican Senator Rand Paul of Bowling Green went golfing with the president over the weekend in New Jersey, according to a statement from the White House. In the past few months, the one-time rivals have become allies, sharing similar views on the need for diplomacy with Russia. In an interview last week with Kentucky Public Radio, Senator Paul said he and the president "get along well" and share similar instincts on foreign policy.

"That the Iraq war was one of the biggest foreign policy mistakes of the last 50 or maybe 100 years," he said. "I think he wants a strong national defense as I do, but I think he also thinks that spending $50 billion a year in Afghanistan may not be the best use of military spending."

Paul has been a staunch supporter of the president's policy on Russia. Senator Paul has taken credit for getting former CIA Director John Brennan’s security clearance revoked, stating that he urged President Trump to take the action. Brennan has criticized the president's outstretched hand to Russia.

Trump and Paul also share some common ground on health care. The commander-in-chief signed an executive order last fall legalizing Association Health Plans nationwide, which allow Americans, through their membership in a trade or professional group, to purchase health insurance across state lines. Supporters say those health plans reduce the cost of coverage.

This story come from member station WKYU. For more stories like this, visit wkyufm.org now