Highest-Ranking Woman Makes Cincinnati Police Department History

Feb 6, 2020

Teresa Theetge is making history as the highest-ranking woman in the Cincinnati Police Department.

"To anyone, including women and girls out there who have a dream of attaining a monumental goal, keep striving to meet your goal and don't let anyone deter you," Theetge said after being sworn in as the executive assistant chief. 

Theetge has been working with CPD for over 29 years. During her time, she has served in different departments like the internal investigations and various ranks, including night chief.

"I've been truly impressed about all the work you have done," City Manager Patrick Duhaney told Theetge as she stood to be sworn in. "You and I got to know each other after April 10, 2018. That was a significant day for the city, for the police department and our 911 center."

That was the day 16-year-old Kyle Plush was crushed to death in his minivan in the parking lot of Seven Hills High School, despite calling 911 twice

Theetge was involved in the investigation that followed. Duhaney says her ability to be vulnerable and transparent helped improve the 911 center.

Theetge told our news partner WCPO that she has more than four high-ranking police officers in her family, including her father, who was a captain for CPD.

She says early in career, people were laying out her path before she could. "Because they kept putting me in assignments that I didn't want or ask for," she says. "You know who you are, up there in the balcony."

During the ceremony at Cincinnati City Hall, five other command staff and captains received promotions.

Chief Eliot Isaac recognized the sacrifices the honorees have made throughout their careers. "I've had the privilege to know them all for many years and work with them," he says. "I know their commitment to the work they do and the love they have for our city and this police department."

He says he feels confident that they're ready for the challenges being a high ranked officer brings in the 21st century.