Center for Closing the Health Gap

domestic violence
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Last year was the deadliest for domestic violence homicides in Cincinnati in 20 years. A local group who helps women says at least 16 women were killed, but the number could be as high as 20. This is all in spite of the city allocating more money than ever to the issue. The cause? Lockdown and social isolation required because of COVID-19.

Courtesy of the Health Gap

The Center for Closing the Health Gap is out with the results of a study on the effects of COVID-19 on Black and Brown communities. CEO Renee Mahaffey Harris says the key takeaway is that marginalized communities want and need transparency.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted African Americans in many communities.  It's true in Hamilton County. 

Courtesy of Center for Closing the Health Gap

Black women have the highest mortality rates when it comes to a lot of diseases despite in some cases being less likely to have those diseases in the first place. Research shows stress and race play a key role in affecting outcomes. The Center for Closing the Health Gap is starting a movement to reduce those numbers.

Courtesy Center for Closing the Health Gap

The Center for Closing the Health Gap will launch the Black Women's Health Initiative early next year. It will be crafted from focus group results being released Tuesday evening.

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A survey by the University of Cincinnati found that African-American adults in Greater Cincinnati are more likely than white adults to report they believe their race and their ability to pay or their type of health insurance negatively impacted the treatment they received from medical professionals.

Center for Closing the Health Gap

The Center for Closing the Health Gap will have to change its ways when spending city taxpayers' dollars, according to an internal audit released by Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black Thursday morning.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

 

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines. This week we'll get an update on the review of taxpayer money spent by the Center for Closing the Health Gap and hear details from the state audit of the Cincinnati Parks Department. We'll also take a look at bills coming out of the Kentucky General Assembly, the top stories in Northern Kentucky, and college basketball.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Lots of people filled the Cincinnati City Hall council chamber Wednesday to show support for the Center for Closing the Health Gap.  

One police officer estimated about 150 were at the meeting, and some 50 of them spoke in favor of the group and the work it does.  

Center for Closing the Health Gap

The Center for Closing the Health Gap was created in 2004 to help improve the health of the poor and uninsured in Cincinnati through education, training and community outreach. Over the last decade the city has provided almost $3.8 million in funding to the nonprofit.  

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Former Cincinnati Mayor Dwight Tillery, currently president of the Center for Closing the Health Gap, is organizing the Black Agenda Cincinnati  summit to look at and develop solutions for challenges facing the African-American community. The day-long summit will be held June 11 at Woodward High School. Joining us to discuss the Black Agenda Cincinnati summit are Word of Deliverance Ministries for the World Senior Pastor and President of the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the National Action Network, Bishop Bobby Hilton; and Center for Closing the Health Gap Founder and President, Dwight Tillery.

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While some neighborhoods in Cincinnati may be lacking in access to healthy foods, there are various community-based efforts being made to overcome what have been called food deserts. The stores that do provide fresh fruits and vegetables, among other options, set an example and bring change to communities in need.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

A Cincinnati Council majority is supporting a plan to provide an additional $2 million to benefit the African-American community.  It would help with health, business development and job training.  

Council Member Wendell Young introduced the motion this week during a Budget and Finance Committee meeting.  

Young presented the following statistics: