Gene Kritsky

cicada safari app
Courtesy of Mount Saint Joseph University

Bug hunters and citizen scientists alike can now download a smartphone app to register cicada sightings. Cicada Safari from Mount Saint Joseph University will allow people to send pictures of cicadas, along with the time and location to Gene Kritsky. He's the dean of behavioral and natural sciences at Mount St. Joe and has been tracking cicadas for years.

Gene Kritsky / Provided

Periodical cicadas are coming out of the ground again this spring, but a Mount Saint Joesph University cicada expert isn't expecting a big show. Gene Kritsky says these particular insects are stragglers from Brood Ten, which is expected to return in 2021.

Gene Kritsky / Provided

The Cincinnati area now has a new sustaining brood of cicadas. In May 2017, insects associated with the Great Eastern Brood came out of the ground four years early.

Frank Hadley Collins

This could be a good year for some bugs and not so good for humans. Gene Kritsky is dean of Mount Saint Joe's behavioral and natural sciences department and says the lack of snow and consistently cold weather this winter will help some insects. He says that weather pattern, repeated over several years, will have a noticeable effect.

Gene Kritsky / Provided

Ohio's only 13-year cicadas, which were creating lots of buzz a few weeks ago in parts of Brown and Clermont Counties, are now fading fast. The adults will be gone by the end of June and their offspring will be falling from trees and by Christmas will be 8-12" below ground, according to entomologist Dr. Gene Kritsky of the College of Mt. St. Joseph and his website.