Kevin Willis

Kevin is the News Director at WKU Public Radio.  He has been with the station since 1999, and was previously the Assistant News Director, and also served as local host of Morning Edition.  He is a broadcast journalism graduate of WKU, and has won numerous awards for his reporting and feature production.  Kevin grew up in Radcliff, Kentucky and currently lives in Glasgow.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul says the White House needs to use a lie detector test to find out who wrote an anonymous op-ed published in the New York Times this week.

The op-ed is purportedly written by a senior official in President Trump’s administration who claims to be a part of an internal resistance effort actively working to block the president’s most extreme policies and instincts.

A judge from northern Kentucky is reportedly not one of the three finalists President Trump is considering as a Supreme Court nominee.

When Justice Anthony Kennedy announced last week that he was retiring from the Supreme Court, speculation immediately focused on who President Trump would nominate to fill the vacant seat.

One of those under consideration has been Amul Thapar, who lives in Covington and is a judge on the Cincinnati-based U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. CNN and other media outlets have reported that Thapar and at least six other candidates have met with Trump since Kennedy’s announcement.

Kentucky is launching a new initiative that will provide more students with computer science education classes from elementary to high school.

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt announced the plan Tuesday at Glasgow High School. The initiative will develop state-based computer science standards, and create professional development opportunities to encourage teachers to attain computer science credentials.

Commissioner Pruitt thinks computer science learning opportunities need to be available to all Kentucky students.

Kentucky’s Secretary of State is again refusing a request to provide state voter information to a federal committee.

In a statement released by her office, Alison Lundergan Grimes said she was declining for a second time the request from her Kansas counterpart, Kris Kobach, who is the head of the Committee on Election Integrity created by President Trump.

The commission was formed after the president claimed millions of people cast illegal ballots in last year’s election. No evidence exists to support the claim.

Saturday’s Kentucky Derby will pump millions of dollars into the Louisville-area economy.

But it will also bring an increase in the number of sexually exploited women and children.

That’s the warning from Amy Leenarts, the director of the Louisville-based anti-trafficking group Free2Hope.

She says people who make money through human trafficking are drawn to high-profile events like the Derby.

“There is a syndicate that runs across the country, and they just simply go to all these big events all over the country, and they bring people with them—girls who are enslaved.”

Leenarts is asking the public to be on the lookout for signs of abuse.

“It can be a child at a hotel where they shouldn’t be, when they’re obviously not with parents. It can be a young adult who has several different phones, or key cards from multiple hotels.”