Ohio News

Though it’s been closed for more than four months, critics are now accusing what was the state’s largest online charter school of deliberately manipulating student data to defraud the state out of millions of dollars. The allegation against the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is coming from a former employee. That allegation is now part of a larger investigation. 

Employers could be getting a big rebate if the Board of Directors for the Ohio Bureau of Worker’s Compensation approves it. 

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that cities have the right to operate traffic cameras. Now the court is deciding whether a lower court can block a plan to cut state funding to certain communities using those cameras. 

The difference between an animal assistant and a pet is an increasing concern for landlords in Ohio and the rest of the country. It was a big part of the discussion of fair-housing law at a conference of hundreds of landlords in Akron this past weekend.

Gov. John Kasich is taking his message for tougher gun control to the county level. A new executive order urges clerks of courts and other agencies to do a better job at entering criminal information into the background check system. Kasich says too many criminals are slipping through the cracks.

Some Democratic lawmakers want an independent investigation into what prompted former House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger to resign. 

March home sale figures for Ohio will be released Monday and regardless of whether the number is higher than the month before, realtors are expecting the current sellers' market to continue.

When it comes to real estate, the market typically goes in cycles. Just ask Karen O'Donnell, president of the Akron Cleveland Association of Realtors.

“It goes down, it comes up, it goes down, it comes up.”

And yet, for the past year, home prices have pretty much only gone up. What gives?

Ohioans will vote May 8 on Issue 1, a plan to change the way Congressional districts are drawn in Ohio. The state is considered one of the most gerrymandered in the United States.

Ohio’s medical marijuana program is supposed to be fully operational on September 8. But there are court battles over problems with the process of choosing cultivators. Some fear it might delay the start of the program. 

A Miamisburg site that played a big role in nuclear history will soon be open to the public. It’s the home of the former Mound Laboratories - known to some in the Miami Valley for its important role in developing the first atomic bomb.
 
Beginning this month the Cold War-era Mound will also house a new Dayton History museum. Organizers hope it will showcase this critical but often controversial chapter of American history.

At the height of operations after World War II, Mound Laboratories in Miamisburg employed around 2,500 workers.

A national review of Ohio’s pre-K system shows the state is struggling compared to other states to provide students access to a quality classroom.

The National Institute for Early Education Research, or NIEER, based at Rutgers University, has been ranking pre-K systems in its annual State of Preschool report since 2002.

A petition submitted by backers of an all-out legalization of marijuana to put the issue before Ohio voters has been rejected.

The Republican leader of Ohio’s Senate says the short term goals of his caucus have been accomplished. But some lawmakers disagree.

The state is moving mental health and addiction services for low income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care by July 1, and it’s the biggest and most complicated change the behavioral health system in Ohio has ever seen. But a survey of more than a hundred of those providers shows the redesign is straining their finances and could shut them down.

Republican Senators want to crackdown on what they deem as overly burdensome regulation coming from state agencies. They’re introducing a new bill after a study from George Mason University said Ohio has nearly 250,000 regulatory restrictions in its code. The senators have a plan to regulate the regulators.

The First Ladies’ Library in Canton is honoring former First Lady Barbara Bush with a special memorial exhibit. Bush died Tuesday at age 92.

The exhibit includes books, videos and letters of the only woman in U.S. history who lived to see both her husband and her son sworn in as president. 

A bill to crack down on payday lending passed an Ohio House committee without any changes, a week after the House Speaker resigned and a vote on the bill was halted.

The Ohio Supreme Court has upheld the constitutionality of Ohio’s death penalty law.

Business groups are calling on lawmakers to pass a bill that would add sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes in discrimination laws. The coalition of companies sees added benefits going beyond civil rights.

A federal appeals court on Wednesday blocked an Ohio law that tried to divert public money from Planned Parenthood in an anti-abortion push by GOP lawmakers.

Officials with Ohio’s medical marijuana program say it won’t be fully in operation by September 8, two years from the date the law creating the program was signed. 

Another state representative has confirmed he’s interested in the job of House Speaker, now that Cliff Rosenberger has resigned following reports that the FBI is asking questions about his travel alongside lobbyists connected to payday lending.

What was once the state’s largest online charter school has been shut down since January – after saying it couldn’t pay the bill the state says it owes for overcounting students. But the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is still trying to win at least one battle in its ongoing legal war with the state.

Ohio voters can now cast their ballots and make their voices heard on various local issues, a big statewide measure on redrawing the Congressional districts map, and primary candidates. 

The number of African American-owned businesses has fallen sharply in Yellow Springs from its peak four decades ago. Only a handful remain in the village.

Antioch College History Professor Kevin McGruder credits some of the shift to rising college-graduation rates among many blacks in Yellow Springs.

"So, as black people have had access to more college they seek more opportunities and jobs they can get with those degrees than in opening up a store," McGruder says.

The sudden resignation of Speaker Cliff Rosenberger – after reports the FBI is looking into his travel records – has left the top leadership role in the Ohio House up for grabs. And those who would like the job are lining up.

County leaders are protesting the state’s strict boundary lines for wind turbines – saying the new law is forcing them to miss out on billions of dollars in economic development by thwarting any new wind farm projects. Opponents of the law still have a long journey towards changing it.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray got a boost today from Democratic Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren - who progressives idolize and conservatives strongly oppose. 

A bill to strengthen and standardize training for school resource officers is on its way to the Senate. The legislation includes funding for schools so they can pay for officers to get that training. 

With a little over three weeks till the primary, the Republican candidates for governor and their supporters are spending millions on advertising. The ad war is heating up, with lawyers now getting involved.

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