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Council committee gets update on parking meters

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Cincinnati recently changed some parking meter rates in parts of Downtown and Over-the-Rhine.  
 

It is part of a contract with the Xerox Company to help analyze the city's parking assets.  City officials are reviewing that data and using it to price meters.  

Community and Economic Development Director Oscar Bedolla said smartphone technology is coming soon.

"We're anticipating the rollout of the pay by phone by the end of May, early June," Bedolla said.  "In combination with that, we're also thinking through our technology associated with a website to provide easier access associated with an app for your phone as well as your ability to use the phone."

The pay by phone app will not actually display time on the parking meter.

"The time will not be displayed on the meter when you pay by phone," said Bob Schroer, who manages the city’s parking assets.  "However there's an app on all our handhelds that allows people to go out and check that that space is paid for."

Parts of Over-the-Rhine west of Vine Street already have multi-space parking technology in place and in use.  Soon those units will be coming to other parts of the neighborhood.  Schroer said 22 additional multi-space meters will be in use east of Vine Street.

"Once our signs are in place, which could be in two to three weeks, we will take the individual meters out and notify the public that now the pay and display machines are in play," Schroer said.

Schroer said the multi-space technology is being used to reduce the number of single space meters, which are targeted by vandals.  

The city said parking fines and revenues increased about $472,000 in the first three months of this year compared to 2014.  That is largely the results of higher meter rates, increased hours and more enforcement.