Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

A federal judge has ordered the release of an Ecuadorean immigrant detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials last month and held for deportation after he delivered a pizza to a U.S. Army installation in Brooklyn.

U.S. District Judge Paul Crotty ordered the release of Pablo Villavicencio, 35, from the Hudson County Correctional Facility in New Jersey. Villavicencio, who is married to a U.S. citizen, applied for a green card in February and is scheduled for an immigration interview next month.

Updated at 2:55 a.m. ET

Lao media report that 19 people are dead and 49 believed missing in southern Laos after an unfinished hydroelectric dam collapsed, releasing a wall of water that inundated downstream villages.

Rescuers searched amid submerged homes, many with people perched on rooftops in an effort to escape the floodwaters after Monday's collapse of a dam that is part of the Xepian-Xe Nam Noy hydropower project in southeastern Attapeu province near neighboring Cambodia.

Key Taliban figures are reportedly among a dozen militants killed in an Afghan army operation over the weekend in the country's northeastern Kapisa province.

The Associated Press reports that "Sharin Aqa Faqiri, army spokesman for northeast Afghanistan, said Mullah Nasim Mushfaq, the Taliban shadow governor for Kapisa, and Qari Esanullah, shadow district chief for Tagab, were among those killed late Sunday night."

The report came as at least two rockets hit the Afghan capital on Tuesday, with one hitting a residential area, wounding four people, according to officials.

Updated at 3:15 a.m. ET

South Korea says it plans to scale back the number of guard posts along its tense border with North Korea and withdraw some military equipment. The move comes amid talks with the U.S. over how much Seoul should pay for its own defense.

The announcement comes as an expert on North Korea's weapons program reports that Pyongyang has begun dismantling key facilities at a satellite launching station in fulfillment of a pledge by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un last month at the Singapore summit with President Trump.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

Seventeen people are dead after an amphibious tourist boat carrying 31 people capsized and sank Thursday during a severe squall in a lake in southern Missouri.

The Ride the Ducks Branson boat sank on Table Rock Lake near the resort town of Branson on Thursday. Divers worked through the night on rescue and recovery operations. On Friday morning, the county sheriff told reporters that all the bodies had been found, bringing the death toll to 17.

British police examining CCTV footage have reportedly identified multiple Russian suspects believed to have carried out the March nerve-agent attack on former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

The Skripals were found slumped on a bench at a shopping center in Salisbury, in southern England, on March 4. Subsequent investigation indicated they were poisoned by a nerve agent of the type Novichok, a group of deadly chemicals developed in the Soviet Union in the 1970s and 80s.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

President Trump is getting a strong reaction after a Fox News interview in which he appeared to question the need to honor NATO's collective defense clause, while suggesting that newest alliance member Montenegro is a country of "aggressive people" who could trigger World War III.

Note to readers: this post uses profanity that may offend some.

Four years after Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine by a Russian-supplied surface-to-air missile, families of the 298 victims are still waiting for Russian President Vladimir Putin to explain what happened.

Alabama Republican Rep. Martha Roby has won a primary runoff against a former Democrat who challenged her over a pledge she made in 2016 not to vote for then-candidate Trump.

Roby, a four-term incumbent representing Alabama's 2nd congressional district in the state's southeast, defeated Bobby Bright, a former "Blue Dog" conservative Democrat who served in Congress until 2011. Bright later switched parties for the run against Roby, whom he tried to paint as insufficiently supportive of the president.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Migrants detained in recent months at the U.S.-Mexico border describe being held in Customs and Border Protection facilities that are unsanitary and overcrowded, receiving largely inedible food and being forced to drink foul-smelling drinking water.

Documents filed Monday in U.S. District Court in California and viewed by NPR late Tuesday contain interviews with some 200 individuals detained under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy, many of whom related poor conditions at the centers.

Netflix says its faulty forecasting caused it to miss its target for new subscribers, falling short by more than a million even as it reported quarterly earnings that beat analysts' expectations.

Asura, a fantasy epic based on Buddhist mythology touted as the most expensive Chinese film ever made, has been pulled from theaters after a dismal opening weekend.

India has ordered its state governments to inspect child care facilities run by the Missionaries of Charity — the Roman Catholic order founded by Mother Teresa — after arrests of a nun and a worker accused of baby trafficking.

Earlier this month, Indian authorities shut down a shelter home for pregnant, unmarried women run by the order in Ranchi, a city in the eastern state of Jharkhand, after discovering that four infants had been sold, including a 6-month-old boy who changed hands for 50,000 rupees ($730).

A mob in Indonesia has slaughtered nearly 300 crocodiles at a wildlife sanctuary in retaliation for a local man who was reportedly killed by one of the reptiles.

The incident occurred in Sorong, on the far western tip of West Papua province.

Entrepreneur Elon Musk and a British diver who helped rescue a dozen boys and their soccer coach from a cave in Thailand last week are engaged in a public spat over the specially designed minisubmarine that Musk offered to rescuers but was never used.

Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay nearly $4.7 billion in damages to 22 women and their families who say asbestos found in the company's talcum powder contributed to their ovarian cancer.

The St. Louis Circuit Court jury awarded $4.14 billion in punitive damages and $550 million in compensatory damages to the plaintiffs, who said the company failed to warn about the cancer risks.

Updated at 7:28 a.m. ET

President Trump, in a wide-ranging interview with The Sun, said British Prime Minister Theresa May ignored his advice on Brexit, a move he said threatens to scuttle a trade deal with the U.S.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Prosecutors in Columbus, Ohio, have dropped criminal charges against Stormy Daniels, the adult entertainer who is suing President Trump, after she was arrested at a strip club Wednesday night for allegedly violating a law that limits touching in such establishments.

More than four decades after the guillotine was last used in an execution in France, a 150-year-old replica of the device made famous in The Terror that followed the French Revolution has sold at auction for the equivalent of $9,355.

The 10-foot-tall guillotine, described as having "a few dents on the blade" had nonetheless never been used in an actual execution, according to the Drouot auction house.

The founder of the Papa John's pizza chain has stepped down as chairman of the board after he apologized for using a racial slur about African-Americans during a conference call in May.

John Schnatter's resignation comes months after he had quit as CEO in the wake of controversial remarks concerning the National Football League's handling of anthem protests.

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