absentee voting

Ohio’s Republican attorney general wants the US Supreme Court to overturn a Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruling extending the deadline for absentee ballots to be returned in that state.

If you’ve requested an absentee ballot, now is the time return it to your local board of elections, Ohio election officials said Wednesday.

Mail-in ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 2, the day before Election Day. Boards will accept properly postmarked absentees up until 10 days after the election, adding valid late arrivals to the post-election official vote canvass.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Local election boards say lots of people are casting their ballots early this year. Campbell County Clerk Jim Luersen points out this is the first general election in Kentucky that's had early voting and it's been non-stop for his office since the doors opened Oct. 13.

early voting
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Over 1.2 million Ohioans have already voted in the Nov. 3 election, both by absentee ballots and in-person early voting at county boards of elections.

early voting
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

This presidential election in Ohio is clearly going to shatter all previous records for turnout. By the time the polling places open on Nov. 3, over half of Ohio voters will have already cast early ballots, either by absentee ballot or in person at county boards of elections.

voting
Tony Dejak / AP

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose, a Republican, has told Ohio's 88 county boards of elections they can have more than one drop box for  absentee voters but they can't be scattered about - they must all be on board of elections' property. But Friday, a U.S. District Court judge in Cleveland ordered LaRose to allow county board of elections to put drop boxes at multiple locations, if they want.

Stark County resident Don Woodward guessed he was mistakenly signed up for poll worker training when he got an envelope from the county’s board of elections the other week. Instead, he found out he had made a mistake on his absentee ballot application.

voting in a pandemic
Tony Dejak / AP

Americans may not agree on a lot these days, but one thing is certain: This is an election year like none other. Whether you are voting by mail, voting early or heading to the polls in-person on Tuesday, Nov. 3, here's everything voters in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana need to know about casting a ballot this year. 

voting
Gene J. Puskar / AP

Leaders with the Hamilton County Board of Elections are making final plans for the Nov. 3 general election. The deadline to register to vote in Ohio is Monday and early, in-person voting for the November election begins Tuesday. 

donald trump
Andrew Harnik / AP

Four years ago, Ohio made Donald Trump very happy by handing him its 18 electoral votes. This year, Ohio has the potential to make him very unhappy by taking them back.

More than twice as many absentee applications have been received from Ohio voters than at this point four years ago, when a record number of early votes were cast in a presidential election in Ohio. 

How Mail-in Voting Works In Ohio: A Step-By-Step Guide

Sep 20, 2020
voting
Tony Dejak / AP

Mail-in or absentee voting has in the past only accounted for a small percentage of all votes cast nationwide. But as a global pandemic stops normal life for most Americans, an unprecedented number of states are encouraging voting by mail, including Ohio and Kentucky.

Absentee ballot requests are flooding into boards of elections. Secretary of State Frank LaRose reports 1.4 million applications have been received so far, well more than the 1.2 million ballot requests received in all of 2016. And early voting doesn’t start till October 6.

A Franklin County court has ruled against Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose, finding that county election boards are allowed to install more than one ballot drop box during the upcoming election.

One of the lawsuits filed over voting in Ohio saw some action this weekend, as Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose received an emergency stay to keep him from having to accept absentee ballot requests by fax or email.

Ohio’s Secretary of State will ask a panel of state lawmakers Monday to allow him to use money raised from business fees to buy postage for mail-in ballots. 

A Franklin County Common Pleas Court judge has ruled Ohioans can apply for absentee mail-in ballots online. 

ballot box
Elaine Thompson / AP

As of mid-week, over 1 million Ohioans had requested absentee ballots for the November election. Election officials expect that many or more between now and the weekend before the Nov. 3 election.

President Trump has repeated his concerns about mail-in voting, which Ohio has allowed as part of its no-fault early absentee voting for 14 years. The message not to vote by mail may be getting through to his supporters. But Democrats are requesting ballots in huge numbers.

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered the normal way of doing things in many areas, and Secretary of State Frank LaRose (R-Ohio) says election night is no exception.

absentee ballots
Nati Harnik / AP

A survey by the Enquirer showed that in the April primary elections, about 21,000 absentee ballots in Ohio weren't counted.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

WXVU senior politics analyst Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik about two major potential problems that could foul up the Nov. 3 election. One is continiung concerns over whether the U.S. Postal Service is equipped to handle the record amount of absentee mail-in ballots, and whether or not COVID-19 concerns will make people reluctant to vote in person at their regular polling places.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

If we had any advice for President Trump and his now-sputtering campaign against the U.S. Postal Service, it would be this:

Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it.

donald trump election night
Evan Vucci / AP

Election officials in Ohio and elsewhere are expecting an enormous turnout for this November's presidential election.

ballot box
Elaine Thompson / AP

Must be some deep thinkers in Columbus at Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost's office.

Kentucky’s top election official says he doesn’t want all voters to be eligible for mail-in voting during the November General Election, though he still wants to allow older and more vulnerable voters to do so.

Secretary of State Michael Adams, a Republican, says he’s worried that local election officials and the Post Office will not be able to handle the influx of mail-in ballots if absentee voting is again expanded to all eligible voters, as it was during Kentucky’s primary election in June.

“I’m dubious we can fully replicate the primary election plan in all respects, as we believe turnout will be 250% higher in November than it was in June. And that was pretty high as it was,” Adams said during a legislative committee on Tuesday.

mail in voting
Tony Dejak / AP

Sometime soon - very soon - Ohio's chief elections officer, Secretary of State Frank LaRose, is going to have to make a decision: Does he make it easier for people with absentee ballots to return them to their county boards of election, or does he make it harder?

voting
Tony Dejak / AP

Every indication is that more Ohioans than ever will choose to vote by mail this November - in part, because of concerns over going to polling places in a pandemic.

A group of voters and advocacy groups are suing to get Kentucky to continue offering mail-in voting to all eligible voters during the November General Election.

Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear and Republican Secretary of State Michael Adams expanded mail-in voting ahead of Kentucky’s June 23rd primary election in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

But no arrangements have been made to continue allowing all Kentucky voters to cast ballots by mail on November 3.

louisville kentucky voting
Timothy D. Easley / AP

Kentucky's primary election on Tuesday went pretty smoothly, despite claims from national celebrities and politicians that there would be widespread chaos as a result of having fewer in-person polling places in the state.

But even though it appears there was record voter turnout during the election, there were still some problems.

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