marijuana

There continue to be concerns by cities and police agencies that they can no longer easily prosecute people who are carrying small amounts of marijuana because of the state’s new law allowing hemp and CBD oil. Some say the problem is there’s no good way to test marijuana to see whether it complies with the new hemp law. 

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The City of Cincinnati is dismissing all charges for 100 grams or less of marijuana.

The backer of a new law legalizing hemp and CBD oil in Ohio says law enforcement officials will soon have access to new testing technology that will be able to easily distinguish the amount of THC in a product. That testing is needed in order for cities to comply with the new law. But at least one city isn't waiting for it and is making a change to its enforcement policies right now.

marijuana
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Cincinnati City Council voted five-three Wednesday to decriminalize the possession of less than 100 grams of marijuana.

marijuana
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Cincinnati Council is expected to finally take votes Wednesday morning on several ordinances to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana.  

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The rush to see which medical marijuana dispensary would be the first to open in Southwest Ohio is over. About Wellness Ohio welcomed customers Tuesday morning, across the parking lot from Walmart, in Lebanon.

Demetrix

At least a dozen bio-tech companies plan to make the main chemicals in marijuana synthetically, according to the MIT Technology Review.

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Jim Nolan / WVXU

Cincinnati City Council considers an ordinance that would mean someone within the city possessing 100 grams or less of marijuana could be cited for a misdemeanor, but would face no fines, no jail time and no court costs.

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A procedural rule prevented Cincinnati City Council from voting Wednesday on an ordinance to take away the penalties for marijuana possession if the city's police department issues citations for such offenses.

marijuana
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The full Cincinnati City Council could vote Wednesday to decriminalize the possession of marijuana in the city.

lloyd library through the rx bottle
Courtesy of The Lloyd Library

Ohio has joined 32 other states in legalizing marijuana for medical use. The plant has a long history in this country as a medicinal drug. The Lloyd Library and Museum explores that history in its current exhibit "Through the Rx Bottle." The exhibit, in collaboration with the Cannabis Museum of Athens, includes century-old botanical illustrations and pharmaceutical artifacts.

A bill that would allow doctors to prescribe marijuana to treat some medical conditions has passed out of a state legislative panel.

Though the legislation has a long way to go to pass out of the legislature, the move amounts to one of the only times that a medical marijuana proposal has advanced in the statehouse.

House Bill 136 would create a state-regulated system that would include growers, processors, dispensers and testers of marijuana.

There are now six medical marijuana dispensaries open in Ohio, with the latest one in East Liverpool opening last week. And the sales at those facilities continue to be brisk. 

After months of delays, patients could be able to get legal medical marijuana in Ohio in a matter of days. 

Dayton voters yesterday overwhelmingly voted in favor of decriminalizing minor marijuana and hashish possession.

Ballot Issue 8 passed with nearly three-quarters of the vote. 

It was an advisory election. Passage opens the door to the possibility of Dayton decriminalizing misdemeanor hashish and marijuana offenses in the future.

Changes could include reducing the financial penalties for possessing up to 100 grams of marijuana, and small quantities of hashish.

Under current law, such offenses carry a fine of $150.

Ohio’s medical marijuana program went into effect on September 8, 2016 yet two years later, the drug hasn’t been dispensed to anyone. It was supposed to be fully operational on September 8th of this year but that’s not happening. Here's why.

Courtesy University of Cincinnati

A marijuana-derived drug the U.S. Food and Drug Administration just approved has connections to Cincinnati.

cincinnati edition
Wikimedia Commons

With Ohio's medical marijuana program scheduled to go into effect later this year, questions are being raised about how companies will treat employees and potential employees who use marijuana as medicine. 

California legalized marijuana in 2016, and on Jan. 1, 2018, eager customers lined up in the darkness outside medical marijuana dispensaries across the state, ready to start shopping at the stroke of midnight.

The effect has gone beyond the cannabis cash register. Everyone has seen the ads or heard the chatter — and that includes minors, though marijuana remains illegal for those under 21.

Backers of a proposed constitutional amendment to make marijuana legal in Ohio have passed the first big hurdle in that process. 

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