Matt Bevin

Kentucky state capitol
Alix Mattingly / WFPL, Kentucky Public Radio

After last week’s court decision that struck down Kentucky’s new pension law, a Republican state representative says he’s confident legislators will pass a new version of the measure if the decision is upheld.

matt bevin
J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin says the judge who struck down Kentucky’s pension law is “not a very competent attorney,” predicting that the ruling will be overturned because the legislation “doesn’t do much.”

Wikimedia Commons

A judge has struck down changes made to Kentucky’s pension systems earlier this year, ruling that lawmakers violated the state constitution by rushing the bill to passage in a matter of hours.

cincinnati edition
Pixabay.com

Kentucky is now the first state in the country to make joint custody the "legal presumption" in divorce proceedings. The new law, signed by Governor Matt Bevin in April, goes into effect in July and requires judges to grant equal custody in all cases, unless one parent has filed a domestic violence protective order against the other within the last three years.    

Ryland Barton / WFPL

During a hearing on Thursday, the judge presiding over the lawsuit against Kentucky’s new pension law questioned why state lawmakers were able to pass the measure out of the legislature in just one day.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Ahead of the July 1 start date for changes to Kentucky’s Medicaid program, Gov. Matt Bevin has announced a partnership with the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky to help educate enrollees on new requirements and assist some in making mandated payments to keep Medicaid insurance.

matt bevin
J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

After suffering a minor loss in the lawsuit over Kentucky’s new pension law on Monday, Gov. Matt Bevin lashed out at the judge overseeing the case again, calling him an "incompetent hack."

matt bevin
J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin says problems in Louisville’s public school system are so severe that “we have got to make changes.” Bevin’s comments come a day after the state’s top education official recommended a takeover of Kentucky’s largest school district.

Wikipedia.org

Separating parents will get joint custody of their children by default under a bill signed into law by Gov. Matt Bevin last week, unless a parent has a recent history of domestic violence.

Kentucky is the first state in the country to create a “legal presumption” for joint custody in divorce proceedings.

empty classroom
Pixabay

Decades before the Kentucky Board of Education forced out former Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt two years before his contract was up, the legislature passed a massive overhaul of the state education system, including measures to try and shield Kentucky’s top education official from political influence.

Pixabay

After a shakeup of Kentucky’s Board of Education last week, conservative groups are pushing for the state to intervene in the management of Jefferson County Public Schools, the state’s largest school district.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

 

This week Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin and Republican leaders in the state legislature released a proposal that would make significant changes to the state's pension system. We'll take a look at details of the proposal and the reaction it's generating from state employees and retirees.

todaysamerica.com

For months, Kentucky's Governor Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear have been in a battle over a variety of issues, from college and university spending to government board and commission seats. Last week, the Kentucky Supreme Court agreed to hear a lawsuit brought by AG Beshear against Governor Bevin. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

A day after saying he'll support a bill to ban tolling on the Brent Spence Bridge, Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin is expanding on how he would pay for a replacement.

He says Ohio and Kentucky can come up with a billion dollars each using something called GARVEE bonds, and use that to leverage the rest of the funds from the federal government.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Wednesday morning about Tuesday's election results in the Tristate - including the massive defeat if Issue 3, which would have legalized marijuana in Ohio; Issue 22; the Cincinnati Parks levy rejected soundly by city voters, and Matt Bevin's somewhat surprising win over Jack Conway in the Kentucky governor's race. 

Once the ultimate political outsider, Louisville businessman Matt Bevin became the second Republican Kentucky governor in four decades Tuesday, defeating Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway.

With all of the state’s 120 counties reporting, Bevin led with 525 percent to 43.8  percent for Conway and four percent for independent Drew Curtis.

  Most of the race between Democrat Jack Conway and Republican Matt Bevin, has been mean as a rattlesnake, and just as venomous, with attack ads and mail pieces clogging the airwaves and the mailboxes of the Commonwealth.

But the end of a debate on Kentucky Educational Television Monday night – the last before the election between Bevin and Conway ended on an almost conciliatory note.

Kentucky voters head to the polls next Tuesday to choose the commonwealth'’s next governor: businessman and Republican Matt Bevin, or Democrat and current Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway.

Howard Wilkinson

Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator, didn’t bring up the subject of his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination when he spoke to the Florence Rotary Club Monday, but he had plenty to say about it to reporters afterwards.

Paul, who is mired in the single digits in national polls, took a back-handed swipe at the Republican candidate who is leading most national polls, business mogul Donald Trump – and he did it without mentioning him by name.

  Political campaigns can turn on a dime sometimes.

There was a time, several months ago, after Louisville businessman Matt Bevin barely survived Kentucky’s Republican primary, when it appeared that the Democratic nominee, Attorney General Jack Conway might win the general election fairly easily.

It would, some thought, be like a Kentucky Wildcat slam-dunk at Rupp Arena.

Nobody’s thinking that anymore.

Pages