Ohio Republican Party

Dayton, Ohio shooting victim memorial
John Minchillo / AP

State Rep. Candice Keller of Middletown is facing calls to resign after a controversial Facebook post following the Dayton mass shooting. In it, she blamed such shooting on "drag queen adovcates," transgender people, illiegal immigration, Barack Obama, and athletes who kneel during the National Anthem, among others. 

david niven
John Minchillo / AP

Last week, when a three-judge panel of the U.S. District Court for Southern Ohio found the congressional district map Ohio has been using since 2012 to be unconstitutional and rigged in favor of the Republicans, there was a disparate range of emotions from one end of the political spectrum to the other.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Lindsey Graham is still mad about Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation process. The South Carolina senator is betting other Republicans are still angry, too. And if they're not, he's on the campaign trail to remind them.

brett kavanaugh donald trump
Susan Walsh / AP

So who, besides Brett Kavanaugh and Donald Trump, won this nasty, bitter, ugly mud-wrestling match that was Kavanaugh's narrow confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court?

donald trump
Evan Vucci / AP

If you were in charge of the Ohio Republican Party, would you want President Trump to come back to the Buckeye State again and again before the November election, as he did last Friday night at the Ohio Republican Party's annual dinner in Columbus?

The Ohio Republican Party held the biggest annual fundraising dinner in the organization’s history on Friday – headlined by President Trump. The Trump factor will certainly be part of this fall’s midterm elections and Ohio’s major statewide races this fall, with some experts predicting big wins for Democrats. However, guests at the annual state dinner say they’re unified behind their party.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with New Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about President Trump's scheduled appearance at the Ohio Republican Party's annual dinner in Columbus. Trump's visit could end up being used as a tool to motivate both Republican voters and Democrats to go the polls in November. 

Provided / DeWine-Husted Campaign

The Ohio Republican Party is feeling confident going into November’s General Election after all of its endorsed statewide candidates won by large margins, starting at the top of the ticket with Mike DeWine as their gubernatorial nominee. The party has a plan to reach out to voters across the spectrum.

george w bush inauguration
WhiteHouse.gov / Wikimedia Commons

I always enjoyed covering presidential inaugurations.

Except for the time I came within an eyelash of getting arrested at one.

Issue 1, the proposed redistricting plan, continues to rack up support ahead of its appearance on the May ballot. Although backers are optimistic it will pass, they’re not putting all of their eggs in this election’s basket.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the four likely Republican candidates for Ohio governor and the impact that President Trump could have on the race. 

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the 2018 statewide elections in Ohio; and whether or not Ohio Democrats can stop the Republicans' march toward making Ohio a totally red state. 

"Leans Republican."

That's the category where Ohio's already-churning 2018 gubernatorial race  is placed by Sabato's Crystal Ball, a highly-respected weekly politics newsletter published by director Larry J. Sabato of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the growing number of Democratic candidates for Ohio governor; and how both the Republicans and Democrats are likely to have lively primary battles for governor in 2018 

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about why, in early 2017, the 2018 Ohio governor's race appears to be ramping up. The main reason: It's an open seat: incumbent John Kasich can't run again. 

The Ohio Republican Party, which has done quite well in statewide elections over the past decade or so, has a nice, neat little bunch of politicians just itching to run for governor next year.

Four of them. Attorney General Mike DeWine. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted. U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci of Wadsworth, in Medina County and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, who filed paperwork with Husted's office on Thursday so she can start campaigning and, most importantly, raising money.

Red, blue or purple.

Those are the three choices on the political spectrum for a city, a county, or a state.

Ohio voters will pick their favorite color in 2018, the next round of statewide elections, in every office from governor and U.S. senator on down.

And how they choose might determine whether the pendulum swings back from red to blue, or at least, purple, in a state where all the statewide constitutional officeholders are Republican and where Donald Trump stunned Ohio Democrats in November by winning Ohio's 18 electoral votes by a sizeable margin.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Friday's election of Trump supporter Jane Timken as Ohio Republican Party chair over incumbent Matt Borges, an ally of Gov. John Kasich. It was a clear victory for Trump in his long-standing feud with the Ohio governor, who never endorsed Trump after he was nominated at the GOP convention in Cleveland. 

Ordinarily, if a presidential candidate were to win the battleground state of Ohio by a fairly sizeable margin of 446,841 votes out of slightly more than 7.8 million cast, you might think that candidate and his political party in Ohio would be on very good terms.

That margin of victory for Donald Trump is the largest for a GOP presidential candidate in Ohio since George H.W. Bush in 1988.

Ohio Republicans should be dancing in the streets.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the funeral plans for former astronaut and U.S. Senator John H. Glenn Jr., who died last week  at the age of 95. And Wilkinson also talked about the brewing battle for control of the Ohio Republican Party between the forces loyal to Ohio Gov. John Kasich and supporters of president-elect Donald Trump. 

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