Politics

Political news

Zoo Levy Renewal

Oct 17, 2013
Cincinnati Zoo

Hamilton County residents will decide whether or not to renew the Zoo levy on November 5. The proposed 5-year property tax levy, which would generate approximately $6.7 million annually, currently accounts for 23% of the Zoo’s annual budget.

The Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County is asking voters to renew its tax levy on election day by voting yes on Issue 1. If renewed, the property tax levy would produce approximately $18.1 million annually for a ten-year period, beginning in fiscal year 2015. The Library would use the funds to help pay for basic operating and maintenance expenses. Kimber L.

Live Mayoral Debate today at 7 PM

Oct 15, 2013
Mark Heyne / WVXU News

The Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber is partnering with WCPO, the League of Women Voters and the Cincinnatus Association to host a live mayoral debate Tuesday, October 15 at 7 PM. 

You can hear a live stream of this debate at wcpo.com/live.

Michael Keating

This week Howard Wilkinson talks about the low number of early voters for the upcoming November 5th election and What bypassing the legislature on Medicaid expansion will mean to Governor Kasich.

With less than a month left to persuade voters, Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley are each making their final push to become Cincinnati’s next mayor. We hear what each candidate has to say, on the streetcar, parking lease plan, balancing the city’s budget, and other issues that will determine the outcome of this election.

Michael Keating

This week WVXU Political Reporter Howard Wilkinson talks about the benefit of being an incumbent in the Cincinnati Council race.

Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati

In 1924 local corruption was so bad that Cincinnati earned the reputation as the worst-governed city in America. In June of that year, a new reform-minded group called the City Charter Committee was founded. Today that group is known as the Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati. Mary Fitzpatrick, former board member, and Executive Committee Chairman Michael Goldman discuss the history and mission of the Charter Committee.

Tea Party convention in Ohio shows split with GOP

Sep 30, 2013
Karen Kasler

Tea Party activists are being told they have a lot of opportunity in next year’s elections, as they continue to oppose Republicans on several issues. But they also are being told they have a lot of work to do.

The more than 300 activists at the statewide Tea Party’s annual We The People Convention seem to be standing solidly against the Republican Party’s most visible candidate next year.

Political Junkie Ken Rudin is back with us again to share his insights on Syria, a possible government shutdown over Obamacare, the debt ceiling, the arguing factions within the Republican Party, and other key issues being debated in the nation’s capital.

The gamble that internet cafe backers have taken to try to stop a law effectively banning those establishments may not pay off. The supporters of those cafes, also called sweepstakes parlors, launched a petition drive to stop the law and put it before voters. But early estimates show that they may not have the 231,000 signatures they need to get the law onto next year’s ballot. Secretary of State Jon Husted said his office will know next week.

Current Ohio gun law says individuals may defend themselves and their property, but they must retreat if able to do so safely. Stand your ground legislation now in the Ohio house would remove that obligation to retreat.

Michael Keating

This week WVXU Political Reporter, Howard Wilkinson talks about how the direct election of Cincinnati's mayor came about, also more talk about John Kasich's presidential ambitions.

City of Cincinnati

Tuesday’s primary election left just two candidates in the race to be Cincinnati’s next mayor. We discuss each candidate’s campaigns and their chance of success in the November general election with Xavier University Assistant Director for Philosophy, Politics, and the Public Honors, Dr. Gene Beaupre, and XU Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology, Dr. Mack D. Mariani. We also take a look at how the race for city council is shaping up.

Michael Keating

John Cranley and Roxanne Qualls will be the candidates for Cincinnati Mayor in November, but the percentages in  yesterday's election surprised some.  WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson shares his thoughts.

The polls are open in Cincinnati, as city residents take their first step toward choosing a new mayor in today's primary election election.

Polling places opened at 6:30 a.m. and the voting ends at 7:30 p.m.

Board of elections officials are expecting a very low turnout. Hamilton County Democratic Party chairman Tim Burke, the chairman of the elections board, said this morning he believes turnout could be as low as 10 percent.

Michael Keating

This week Howard Wilkinson talks about tomorrow's Cincinnati Mayoral primary and what we can expect between now and November.

Cincinnati voters head to the polls tomorrow to cast ballots in the city's mayoral primary.  Hamilton County Board of Elections Deputy Director Sally Krisel says it's hard to judge how busy the polls will be since there have only been two mayoral primaries in the past.  The election in 2001 was on September 11th, the day of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. 

Krisel says turnout that day was especially low, in 2005-- 21 percent of the voters came out to vote and there was no primary in 2009. 

US House of Representatives

  

Republican Brad Wenstrup was elected in 2012 to represent the people of Ohio’s Second Congressional District in the US House of Representatives. Mr. Wenstrup is a medical doctor, Army Reserve officer, Iraq War veteran, and small business owner. He joins us to discuss the issues facing the nation and the district he represents.

    Ohio Governor john Kasich wants to expand the state’s Medicaid program, but is getting push-back from conservative Republicans in the General Assembly. Kasich, Ohio Democratic legislators and other proponents of Medicaid expansion say it will save the state money and insure more Ohioans, but opponents claim it will cause Ohio to lose jobs and increase the state’s cost to cover health care.

WVXU Political Reporter talks with Jay Hanselman about the death of former Ohio Governor John Gilligan, who died yesterday in Cincinnati.  He was 92.

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