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Hopkinsville Funeral Home Adds Drive-Through Window

aylor's Funeral Home in Hopkinsville has added a drive-through window for friends and family who prefer to pay their respects from the car due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Credit Taylor's Funeral Home
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aylor's Funeral Home in Hopkinsville has added a drive-through window for friends and family who prefer to pay their respects from the car due to the coronavirus pandemic.

  The COVID-19 pandemic has taken the lives of more than 6,400 Kentuckians. The grief has been intensified by health precautions that limit how many people can attend a funeral.

A funeral home in Christian County has added a safe way for friends and family to grieve.

Taylor’s Funeral Home in Hopkinsville broke through a brick wall to add a four-by-eight-foot window two weeks ago.

The first window broke, but a new one is now in place to allow friends and family to safely view the funeral chapel from their cars.  

“COVID has been very difficult. We have buried a lot of people that we knew, family and friends, it’s been terrible," said Taylor. "We hope this never happens again, but if it does, we gotta have something in place.”

The Taylor funeral chapel holds about 220 people, and that’s currently reduced to 120 under COVID safety guidelines.

If the family requests making use of the drive-through, the casket is placed near the window a couple of hours before the visitation or funeral.

Those who feel safer at the drive-through window can take a few minutes to pay their respects, then move on to allow those in the next car to do the same.

The casket is then moved in front of the pulpit in the chapel beore the in-person visitation or funeral begins. 

Owner Terry Taylor has been in the funeral business for 22 years and said even with COVID-19 safety precaution place, many people have told him they still don’t feel safe being indoors with a group of people. 

Copyright 2021 WKMS

Rhonda Miller began as reporter and host for All Things Considered on WKU Public Radio in 2015. She has worked as Gulf Coast reporter for Mississippi Public Broadcasting, where she won Associated Press, Edward R. Murrow and Green Eyeshade awards for stories on dead sea turtles, health and legal issues arising from the 2010 BP oil spill and homeless veterans. She has worked at Rhode Island Public Radio, as an intern at WVTF Public Radio in Roanoke, Virginia, and at the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Rhonda’s freelance work called Writing Into Sound includes stories for Voice of America, WSHU Public Radio in Fairfield, Conn., NPR and AARP Prime Time Radio. She has a master’s degree in media studies from Rhode Island College and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Boston University. Rhonda enjoys quiet water kayaking, riding her bicycle and folk music. She was a volunteer DJ for Root-N-Branch at WUMD community radio in Dartmouth, Mass.