American history

Provided. Cincinnati Museum Center

The women's suffrage movement in the United States officially began with the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. In 1855, a National Woman Suffrage Conference was held in Cincinnati. But it took until the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920 for women to gain the right to vote.

The Founding Fathers And Our Financial System

Jun 26, 2017
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With the Fourth of July coming up next week, we take a look at the world of finance through the eyes of our country’s founders – a “Founding Fathers Finance Party,” so to speak.

Simon and Schuster

Herbert Hoover was the 31st President of the United States, serving, from 1929 to 1933. Often considered placid, passive, unsympathetic, and even paralyzed by national events, Hoover faced an uphill battle in the face of the Great Depression. Many historians dismiss him as ineffective. But in Herbert Hoover in the White House, biographer Charles Rappleye reveals a very different figure. The real Hoover, argues Rappleye, just lacked the basic tools of leadership.

Simon & Schuster

1789 was a perilous time for the newly-formed United States. The first representatives of the new Federal Congress arrived in New York City with little idea how the nation's government would actually work. There were arguments underway over numerous issues from presidential power to national finance, as well as the idea of placing the nation's capital on the Potomac River.

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The political environment of 1896 had a lot of similarities to today: an electorate transformed by a growing immigrant population, an uncertain economy disrupted by new technology, growing income inequality and political gridlock that prevented the parties from resolving big issues.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A rare copy of the 13th Amendment is now on display at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. 

Director of Museum Experiences Richard Cooper says this particular copy was originally owned by Schuyler Colfax, who was the Speaker of the House when the amendment was drafted.

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation On Display

Sep 22, 2015

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian David McCullough has just released his latest book, a fascinating look at the men from Dayton, Ohio who took flight from Kitty Hawk.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

An archeological dig in eastern Clermont County is just about to end for this year.  But the dig is just the beginning of the story. 

Museum Center honors military history, sacrifices

May 14, 2015
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The Cincinnati Museum Center's new exhibit, Treasures of Our Military Past, opens Friday.  It features artifacts and exhibits from the region, all related to armed conflicts over the last two centuries.

Dreamers & Doers, Kentucky women in history

May 4, 2015

  “Dreamers & Doers: VOICES of Kentucky Women” is a film documentary inspired by the women in the Commonwealth who boldly opened doors in politics, science, education, entertainment, literature, athletics, religion and the military. Joining us to discuss film and the achievements of some of the more than 40 women portrayed in the documentary are Eleanor Jordan, executive director of the Kentucky Commission on Women; Dr.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Rearranging historical artifacts is nothing new at the Cincinnati Museum Center.  Temporary exhibits come and go.  But rarely is the move a big production as it was Tuesday morning.

Three employees of a rigging company set up a trestle overhead as they prepared to move 3,500 pounds of iron in the form of a 150-year-old cannon.  They placed blankets around the barrel; and connected straps to a chain pulley system.  They were as careful as they could be.

  This month marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson’'s decision to begin the massive escalation of the Vietnam War. The war, which ended in April 1975, bitterly divided the United States between those who saw a need to suppress the spread of communism and those who challenged the morality, legality and practically of fighting in a distant southeast Asian country. Vietnam’'s impact is still being felt today, especially in the two recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.