ptsd

A new study finds that a program based in Louisville, Kentucky is having a positive impact on military veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. 

The results published in the Journal of Veterans Studies show that veterans with PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury report an improved psychological outlook after participating in ‘Dancing Well: The Soldier Project.’ 

Dance educator Deborah Denenfeld offered the first version of the program in 2010 at the suggestion of a psychiatrist at Fort Knox, who thought it might help improve memory in veterans with these combat-related issues.

In 2014 Denenfeld launched the 10-week version Dancing Well in Louisville. It's essentially a community barn dance, slowed down and adapted to the physical and emotional comfort levels of this particular group of veterans.


Who Do First Responders Call For Help?

Aug 16, 2018

Blood has a distinct, coppery scent. If that's what Brandon Dreiman smelled when he stepped off the fire truck, he knew his job wasn’t going to be easy.

Bad News Fatigue: How To Curb Your Consumption

Dec 14, 2017
Pixabay.com

If the last political story you heard on NPR got your blood boiling, the last article you read online made you feel hopeless and the last time you scrolled Facebook to cheer you up you saw a video that made you cry, it may be time to curb your media consumption.

The men and women who serve in our military, and their families,  face a variety of challenges and changes in their lives, during active duty time and after service members return from deployment and reintegrate back into more normal routines.

Provided

During World War II, Army Air Corps fighter pilot Lieutenant Herschel Ponder flew 51 missions over Europe. Forty-five years later he wrote about his experience. His daughter, Carol Ponder, and her husband, Robert Kiefer, both long-time entertainers, used her father’'s memoir to create Ponder Anew: A WWII Warrior'’s Story. Performances of Ponder Anew and their accompanying workshops are being used to help military personnel and combat veterans open up about their wartime experiences, and cope with PTSD and other mental or emotional problems they may face.

Joining us to discuss Ponder Anew and its role in helping members of the military, veterans, and their families, are Carol Ponder and Robert Kiefer; Sherry Walker, a social worker and therapist on the Alvin C. York campus of the Tennessee Valley Healthcare System in Murfreesboro, Tennessee; and Laure Quinliven, a board member of Heroes Fund, which provides support locally to active duty military serving in a combat zone and veterans who served in combat zones.

Two free performances of Ponder Anew are being presented locally November 13 and 14 by the Heroes Fund. For information, click here.

Thank You for Your Service

Oct 27, 2013
macmillan.com