2014 election

One hundred and four poll workers were let go by the Hamilton County Board of Elections Tuesday because they hadn't voted since the 2012 election.

They were all working polling places during the 2013 and 2014 elections, but did not cast ballots themselves, according to the board staff.

Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune had a really bad experience with the Ohio Democratic Party early this year – especially with state party chairman Chris Redfern.

Last December, Portune – the only Democrat on the county commission – started crisscrossing the state in an attempt to build support to run for Ohio governor.

The problem was that Portune started too late – Ed FitzGerald, the Cuyahoga County executive – had been campaigning since early in 2013; and had already wrapped up the party establishment and the endorsement of the state party.

Republicans were dancing on their desks Tuesday night. Democrats’ chins were dragging on the floor. But before we shut the door on the 2014 election, here are some final thoughts on what happened Tuesday, especially here in southwest Ohio.

Thomas/Winburn:

Conventional wisdom had the 9th Ohio Senate District race between former Cincinnati council member Cecil Thomas and current council member Charlie Winburn going down to the wire.

But, in the end, Thomas crushed Winburn, knocking him flatter than a pancake with 57 percent of the vote.

  

WVXU politics reporter talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about Tuesday's election - one which saw the Republicans sweep all of Ohio's statewide offices, as they did four years ago.

Seal of Hamilton County
Provided / Hamilton County

The makeup of the Hamilton County Commission won't change after Tuesday’s elections.  When County Commission President Chris Monzel voted to separate Music Hall from the “Save Our Icons” proposal, some voters were incensed, and took a renewed interest in his re-election campaign.  His official Democratic challenger was Sean Patrick Feeney, a relative unknown to local politics.  Feeney refused to step aside for a more well-known name: former Vice Mayor Jim Tarbell.  Tarbell mounted his own write-in campaign.  But in the end, it didn't matter.  Tarbell pulled in only about 3.5% of the vote, w

Jon Hughes/photopresse

Beverly Haskins was determined to do her part when casting her ballot at the Westwood United Methodist Church Tuesday. She said, "After the recent issues with Tracie Hunter, as a voter, I just want to make sure, I can do what I can so it doesn't happen again."

Voters say they studied up

There was a steady stream of traffic in and out of Westwood United Methodist. Voter Steve Sheblessy was determined to be informed in what was a lengthy ballot. He said, "You've got to do your homework to get the things passed that you need to get in and get done."

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about prospects for voter turnout Tuesday and the races to watch.

Ohio voters may be about to make history.

But not the kind of history you’ll want to brag about.

It looks increasing likely that, on Tuesday, Ohio will have the lowest turnout in a gubernatorial election since the Ohio secretary of state began tracking voter turnout in 1978.

And, at least in Northern Kentucky, the turnout may be pretty low too – even with one of the noisiest, most expensive and most important U.S. Senate races in the country, pitting Republican Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell against Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

About Campbell County:

Campbell is the easternmost of the three Northern Kentucky counties that border the Ohio River at Cincinnati. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the 2013 population at nearly 91,000. There are 15 cities in the county; and it also includes substantial amounts of rural areas and farm land. According to the 2010 Census, the median household income from 2008 to 2012 was $53,580, compared to the statewide average of $42,610.

Ken Rudin (The Political Junkie) and Neal Conan (former host of Talk of the Nation) will talk all things politics with you and special guests, plus trivia, the Scuttle Button quiz, and more on Friday, November 21 at Cincinnati’s Masonic Center (next to the Taft Theater) at 7:30 pm.

Doors open at 6:30 pm.
Tickets will be available at the door the night of the show for $25.

Live Election Night Coverage

Oct 28, 2014

Beginning at 10 pm, Statehouse News Bureau Correspondent Karen Kassler and WOSU's Mike Thompson will be providing live election night coverage from Columbus. Reporters Jo Ingles will be reporting live from the Ohio Democratic Party’s headquarters and Andy Chow from the Ohio Republican Party’s headquarters.

Alright, it’s settled now.

The two voter information posters from Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted – a candidate for re-election – which display his name prominently featured will be posted in Ohio’s polling places.

28th Ohio House District

Sarah Ramsey

9th Ohio Senate District:

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about voter turnout in Ohio and Kentucky; and about Jim Tarbell's write-in campaign for Hamilton County commissioner.

Early last Tuesday morning – the first day of early in-person voting at Ohio’s boards of elections – we stopped by the Hamilton County Board of Elections downtown fully expecting to see a line of voters eager to cast the first ballots in the 2014 election.

In past years – particularly gubernatorial and presidential elections – there have been long lines outside the board’s offices on Broadway, sometimes stretching around the block. Sometimes, people would camp out overnight on the sidewalk to be first in line.

Not this time.

Registered Ohio voters can begin in-person early voting at their county boards of elections beginning 8 a.m. Tuesday.

Ohio is back to the hours set earlier by Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, with 28 days to vote by absentee ballot or in-person at the boards of elections.

Early voting might have started on Sept. 30, but the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 29 granted an emergency plea from state officials to block a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling expanding early voting days and times.

Every sign points to a blow-out in the Ohio governor’s race, with Democratic challenger Ed FitzGerald going down to a massive defeat at the hands of Republican incumbent John Kasich.

You never know what might happen to turn that around, but the polls show it coming – a Quinnipiac University poll of likely Ohio voters last week had FitzGerald, the Cuyahoga County executive, down by 22 percentage point with about five weeks left.

Even worse, one in four Democratic voters polled by Quinnipiac said they plan to vote for Kasich.

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