history

Kyeland Jackson / WFPL

If you’ve ever wanted to step aboard a ship like the ones used by Christopher Columbus, this is your chance.

nagasaki atomic cloud
Courtesy / U.S. Office for Emergency Management Office of War Information

On August 6, 1945, during World War II, an American B-29 dropped the atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The explosion wiped out 90 percent of the city and immediately killed 80,000 people. Tens of thousands more would later die of radiation exposure. Three days later, another atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Japan surrendered on August 15.

mammoth cave
Jackie Wheet / Mammoth Cave National Park

In 1866, Cincinnati photographer Charles Waldack snapped the nation’s first cave photos. Some say they may be the first in the world. Practical photography had been around less than 30 years, and while success was uncertain, these photos helped put Mammoth Cave—now a UNESCO World Heritage Site—on the map.

How much do you know about Colerain Township? 

camp chase
George C. Campell / Wikimedia Commons

Last Monday, we all stopped to recognize Memorial, or Decoration, Day.

In the process of research for his 2001 book, "Race and Reunion," Yale Historian David Blight stumbled into the story of the first Decoration Day, just weeks after the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox.

Provided

On January 23, the Holocaust & Humanity Center will present Violins of Hope, a community performance featuring nine Holocaust era violins, played by some of Cincinnati's finest musicians.

amazon.com

Imagine what it would be like to be the son or daughter of a dictator, someone most of the world considers a monster, such as Stalin or Pol Pot. What would you do, if you were the child of someone so infamous?

National Archives and Records Administration

 

Seventy-five years ago today, Japanese forces attacked the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

The lesser-known connection between General Ulysses S. Grant and the Underground Railroad is explored in-depth in the book Ulysses Underground: the Unexplored Roots of U. S. Grant and the Underground Railroad

Provided

President Theodore Roosevelt called them the most American thing in America. He was talking about the chautauqua tent assemblies that originated in the 19th century and quickly grew across rural America, bringing entertainment and culture to entire communities.

In his new book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis, Politico eHealth Editor Arthur Allen tells the true story of the battle against disease and genocidal ideology, told through the lives of microbiologists Rudolf Weigl and Ludwick Fleck, who fought typhus and cruelty from the Russian POW camps of WWI to the ghettos and concentration camps of Nazi-occupied Europe.

Richard O. Jones was a longtime writer for The Hamilton Journal-News, but he has now embarked on a new career as true crime historian.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

An archeological dig in eastern Clermont County is just about to end for this year.  But the dig is just the beginning of the story. 

Provided / Margaret McDiarmid and family

Along US 52, near New Richmond are the remnants of a school that played a role in American history.  Until now, that school had been largely forgotten.

But a professor at Northern Kentucky University is hoping to uncover details about the Parker Academy by unearthing its debris and bringing its story to light.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Rearranging historical artifacts is nothing new at the Cincinnati Museum Center.  Temporary exhibits come and go.  But rarely is the move a big production as it was Tuesday morning.

Three employees of a rigging company set up a trestle overhead as they prepared to move 3,500 pounds of iron in the form of a 150-year-old cannon.  They placed blankets around the barrel; and connected straps to a chain pulley system.  They were as careful as they could be.

Rowan & Litttlefield Publishers

This interview originally ran on December 18, 2013

Blood Feud, the Hatfields & McCoys

Sep 22, 2014
Provided, Lisa Alther

NOTE: This interview originally aired March 7, 2014

  

Blood Feud: The Hatfields and the McCoys

 

Pompeii Revealed

Sep 22, 2014
Provided, University of Cincinnati

NOTE: This interview originally aired March 7, 2014.

  

Note: This interview originally aired March 18, 2014.

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