Education

Provided / Wilberforce University

The nation's oldest historically black private university is maintaining its accreditation. Wilberforce University has been fighting to keep its  status for more than year after a review found sub-par academic programs, severe cuts to faculty and staff, a $9.7 million deficit and low enrollment.

Being the parent of a child who struggles in school can be both challenging and frustrating. But parents of gifted children face their own challenges and frustrations. And while most schools are able to recognize students who need extra help and provide them with additional tutoring and guidance, many schools are not equipped to meet the needs of truly gifted students.

WVXU

The Cincinnati Fire Department could learn this week if it will receive a federal grant to pay for a 40-member recruit class that starts in February. 

The city has been successful in getting these Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency (SAFER) grants.  SAFER grants come from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, but fire chief Richard Braun says it gets harder each time.

Center on Reinventing Public Education

A report out Wednesday on the state of U.S. public schools finds performance is relatively flat. But the study from the University of Washington suggests Cincinnati's public and charter schools are making progress.

This interview originally aired July 6, 2015.

Fixing the troubled educational system is one of the critical issues facing our country, but where do you start and what direction do you go? International education leader and author Sir Ken Robinson delved into the topic in a 2006 TED talk, How Schools Kill Creativity, which has had more than 31 million views and generated thousands of queries on how to solve this problem.

This story originally aired on February 24, 2015.

NaviGo Scholars is a distinctive one-on-one coaching and mentoring program for high school students which engages businesses in the students futures, and responds to demands for a trained and educated workforce to meet our region's future needs.

Thursday, September 3 at 7:00 p.m. 

From American RadioWorks: Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Teaching Teachers

Aug 6, 2015

Thursday, September 10 at 7:00 p.m.

From American RadioWorks: Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job.

Thursday, September 17 at 7:00 p.m. 

From American RadioWorks: The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944.

Thursday, September 24 at 7:00 p.m.

Greater Cincinnati School Advocacy Network

More than 40 southwest Ohio school districts say they're fed up with state and federal intervention.

The newly-formed Greater Cincinnati School Advocacy Network aims to lobby legislators to scale back on unfunded mandates.

Beginning with only eleven students and a staff of three Sisters of Charity, a young priest, Father Henry Waldhaus, embarked on a mission which would produce the first accredited high school for the deaf in Ohio. This year, St. Rita School for the Deaf is celebrating its 100th anniversary.

Local educators back from exploring Cuba

May 8, 2015

A group of professors and students from Mount St. Joseph University visited Cuba for an educational and cultural trip last month. 

  Thirty-five highly respected educators from the United States and Canada have been selected as this year'’s Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education Grosvenor Teacher Fellows. The Fellows will take expeditions to locations such as Iceland, Greenland and Antarctica, for hands-on experience, professional development, and what most would say, a trip of a lifetime.

Adjusting curriculum for kids in poverty

Mar 25, 2015
Mark Urycki / StateImpact Ohio

In January, an analysis of federal data found that for the first time in at least 50 years more than half of the public school children in America are living in poverty. In Ohio, the number is only 39 percent, but it still concerns school officials here who know that poor kids come to school carrying extra burdens. In recent years education officials have been looking to brain research for answers.

Legislators listening to concerns about time spent on standardized tests

Mar 5, 2015
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

If you talk to a school student, a teacher or a parent these days, you are likely to hear one complaint loud and clear: there is too much testing under new federal education standards. Lawmakers are also hearing that message. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports on what they are doing about it.

Provided / Mount St. Joseph University

Mount St. Joseph University is searching for a new leader. President Tony Aretz announced his resignation Tuesday. He'll officially step down at the end of the academic year.

In a statement Aretz writes, "I have been able to complete many of the goals I had when arriving at the Mount and throughout the rest of my career, will reflect upon the many accomplishments we achieved with great pride.”

The university says the move is Aretz' decision and he plans to explore other opportunities.

  The ever-increasing volume of information produced each day that touches virtually every aspect of our lives demands a continued supply of trained professionals to properly manage how that information is processed, stored, distributed and protected. A recent survey showed information technology hiring will increase up to 26% this year.

Boys and Girls Clubs

Jan 30, 2015

Boys & Girls Clubs of America had its beginnings in 1860 with three women in Hartford, Connecticut who believed that boys needed a positive alternative to roaming the streets. Since then the organization has expanded, with clubs across the country providing a safe place for kids to learn, grow, and reach their full potential. Here to talk about the mission and some of the programs offered locally are Michelle Seither, Operations director for the Boys & Girls Clubs of West Chester/Liberty, and Boys and Girls Club of Greater Cincinnati Director of Operations Bill Bresser

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