U.S. Supreme Court

Updated at 2:33 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee held its fourth and final day of hearings on Thursday on President Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, Barrett, 48, would replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the high court.

The Senate Judiciary Committee begins confirmation hearings Monday for Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's nominee to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court left after the death last month of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

rob portman
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

In February 2016, nine months before the presidential election that produced the Trump presidency, President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a respected federal appeals court judge, to replace a conservative justice of the Supreme Court, Antonin Scalia, who died suddenly that month.

President Donald Trump announced his new Supreme Court Justice pick "will be a woman" at a campaign stop in Dayton, Ohio on Monday.

Trump said his team has been vetting five finalists, and that the official announcement would come on Friday or Saturday this week.

Cliff Owen / AP

Following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg - and with little more than a month to go before a presidential election - President Trump has said he will announce his third appointee to the U.S. Supreme Court later this week. Democrats, Republicans, and most of America, have a lot to say about this. 

Follow NPR's coverage of Ginsburg's death and the political aftermath here.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural and feminist icon, died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas.

The court, in a statement, said Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., surrounded by family. She was 87.

daniel cameron
Timothy D. Easley / AP

President Donald Trump has announced 20 people he'd consider to be on the U.S Supreme Court if he has to fill another vacancy, and among them is first-term Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron.

Cameron is 34 years old and the first Black person to independently hold statewide office in Kentucky. He is a protégé of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and worked as general counsel in his Senate office.

cincinnati pride
John Minchillo / AP

Last week, in a 6-3 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that federal law prohibits any employment discrimination against people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT).

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled in favor of anti-discrimination protections for LGTBQ people in the workplace. Advocates in Ohio are celebrating the decision but say there's still more work to be done on the state level.

the supreme court in washington dc
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Cincinnati Edition speaks with New York Times bestselling author Adam Cohen about his new book, Supreme Inequality: The Supreme Court's Fifty-Year Battle for a More Unjust America, which explores how the court's rulings contributed to inequality in the U.S.

the supreme court in washington dc
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Sometimes, when there is a hot-button issue before the nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, I am asked what I think the black-robed sages will do.

My answer is always the same.

Updated at 8:14 p.m. ET

Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor says she has been diagnosed with "the beginning stages of dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease," in an open letter that was released Tuesday.

O'Connor, 88, is the first woman to serve on the high court and has remained active since retiring in 2006. She left the court to care for her husband, John, after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. Now, O'Connor says, her condition is forcing her to withdraw from public life.

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

A sharply divided Senate — reflecting a deeply divided nation — voted almost entirely along party lines Saturday afternoon to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A little more than two hours later, Kavanaugh was sworn in during a private ceremony as protesters stood on the court's steps.

brett kavanaugh
Alex Brandon / AP

In an unusual weekend session, the U.S. Senate advances to a final vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Watch the proceedings live.

us capitol
James Doyle/NPR

Senator Susan Collins (R-ME), is speaking on the floor of the US Senate today at approximately 3:00 p.m. ET. She's talking about her position on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Updated at 8:41 p.m. ET

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court cleared a key procedural hurdle in the Senate on Friday, and his confirmation now seems all but certain, after a key swing vote, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, declared her support in a speech on the Senate floor.

Moments after Collins completed her remarks, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., announced in a statement that he too will support the nomination when it comes up for a final vote.

That final vote is expected as soon as Saturday.

kavanaugh protest
Austin Fast / WVXU

Republican Senate leaders are closing in on a final vote on Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, but local opponents spent Thursday night protesting his candidacy at the Hamilton County Courthouse.

Liam James Doyle/NPR

The Senate is taking a procedural vote on whether or not to move Judge Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination forward.

brett kavanaugh
Saul Loeb / AP

The bitter fight over Judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court has overshadowed other recent political news, including President Trump's address to the United Nations, a possible second U.S.-North Korea summit and the fate of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

brett kavanaugh
Saul Loeb / AP

The Senate Judiciary Committee is voting on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination. A full Senate vote on the nomination is expected early next week.

Watch the proceeding live starting at 1:30 p.m. ET. If it is after the scheduled time and you do not see the live stream, please try refreshing the page. 

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