Dean Regas

NASA/The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA

Later this month the planet Mars will make its closest approach to Earth in 15 years, appearing large and bright enough to be easily seen with the naked eye.

100 things to see in the night sky
Amazon

Dean Regas, an astronomer for the Cincinnati Observatory and host of WVXU's "Looking Up" podcast, published this field guide to stargazing in 2017, and if you donate now during our spring fund drive, you'll receive Regas' book as a gift! 

ira flatow
@scifri / Instagram

Editor's note: Post-show, Flatow will host a live chat on WVXU's Facebook page starting at 4:45 p.m. We invite all to tune in and ask questions. 

Ira Flatow broadcasts his "Science Friday" show from WVXU-FM 2-4 p.m. Friday before taping interviews Saturday at Miami University in Oxford.

Provided

The annual Geminid meteor shower peaks tonight and early tomorrow. With up to 120 meteors per hour shooting across the night sky, it's expected to be one of the best celestial shows of the year.

Penguin Random House

Astronaut Scott Kelly is the veteran of four spaceflights and served as commander of the International Space Station. He holds the American record for consecutive days spent in space. Now in his recently-released memoir, "Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery," Scott Kelly discusses his experiences living aboard the International Space Station, and how he got there in the first place. 

Luc Viatour / Wikipedia

In a month, Americans will be able to witness something that hasn't happened here in 38 years. The moon will pass between the earth and the sun, casting a shadow across parts of the country. It's such a rare experience, some people will travel to witness it. 

NASA/JPL-Caltech

A University of Cincinnati professor is helping NASA plan the next mission to Mars, in search of ancient life. Dr. Andrew Czaja is among a team of scientists determining where on Mars to land the most sophisticated rover to date. Part of the Mars 2020 mission is to collect rock samples for evidence the Red Planet once sustained microbial life.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

On July 12 Cincinnati Public Radio introduces a new podcast, "Looking Up," with the Cincinnati Observatory's Dean Regas and Anna Hehman. The first podcast created exclusively by Cincinnati Public Radio separate from its on-air programming, "Looking Up" will cover the latest astronomical discoveries, science and technology, and interesting facts about the stars and planets, all in a fun, down to Earth way.

WVXU-FM

Dean Regas and Anna Hehman from the Cincinnati Observatory will voice Cincinnati's newest podcast, "Looking Up," starting Wednesday, July 12.

The 20- to 25-minute program -- the first produced by WVXU-FM exclusively as a downloadable audio file and not for a broadcast -- will be available on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month, says Kevin Reynolds, the Cincinnati Public Radio community relations manager who produces the podcast.

Looking Up Trailer

Jul 5, 2017

Looking Up, the first original podcast from Cincinnati Public Radio, debuts July 12 on iTunes and wvxu.org. 

European Southern Observatory/L. Calçada/M. Kornmesser

At a distance of 320 light years from Earth there is a planet in constant daylight, with three suns and seasons longer than a human lifetime. We don’t just know it’s there, we have visual proof.

Provided

He has been the outreach astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory since 2000, written dozens of articles about the skies above us and co-hosts the popular public television series Star Gazers

universe-beauty.com

Last week, the popular public television series Star Gazers celebrated the airing of its 500th episode, highlighting our continued fascination with the wonders and mysteries of outer space.

commons.wikipedia.org

The Cincinnati Observatory Center was the first public observatory in the Western Hemisphere, and is known as “The Birthplace of American Astronomy.” Today Greater Cincinnati is home to three observatories.

Dean Regas on From the Earth to the Moon

Oct 16, 2015

Dean Regas, outreach astronomer from the Cincinnati Observatory, talks about the 150th anniversary of the publication of Jules Verne’s classic From the Earth to the Moon and some local book club events he’ll be taking part in to celebrate this occasion.

  Former NPR science correspondent, award-winning TV journalist and author Ira Flatow is the host of the the weekly radio show, Science Friday. Dean Regas, outreach astronomer and assistant director with the Cincinnati Observatory, is co-host of the popular PBS series, Star Gazers.

Wikimedia Commons

The sun, earth and moon will align for the third time in less than a year next weekend.  In Cincinnati you can see a partial lunar eclipse on Saturday April 4 beginning at 6:15 a.m.

Co-Host of the PBS program, Star Gazers and Outreach Astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory Dean Regas says:

  If you’'ve had enough of looking at the snow, ice and slush, then bundle-up and head outside and look up at the wonders taking place above us, or attend one of the programs offered by the Cincinnati Observatory.

Dean Regas / Cincinnati Observatory

Early risers are in for a treat Wednesday morning. A total lunar eclipse begins at 5:15 am.  The Cincinnati Observatory's Dean Regas says that's when the shadow of the earth will being moving across the moon creating an orange tint that some refer to as a 'blood moon.'

The moon should be fully eclipsed by 6:30 am and will set around 7:30 am.

  Maybe we just weren'’t paying attention before, but it seems as if there’'s been a lot more celestial activity going on this year. Blood Moons, Super Moons, eclipses, meteor showers, planets in opposition...we’'ve even had a triple Jovian shadow transit. And if you don’'t know what that is, you'’re in luck.

cincinnatiobservatory.org

The Cincinnati Observatory, 'The Birthplace of American Astronomy' and home to the oldest professional telescope in the US, is always a wonderful destination for anyone, of any age, who is curious about science, astronomy and the world around them.

This summer, the observatory has several activities lined up to engage, entertain and enlighten those interested in the sun, the moon, Saturn - and other cosmic entities that make up our own solar system.

Meteorites Through the Observatory Lens

Nov 3, 2013
The Cincinnati Observatory

Nick Ares from Auburn, CA / Originally posted to Flickr by aresauburn

Pull out a comfy lawn chair, grab some snacks and face to the east this weekend for a view of the annual Perseid  meteor shower.  Cincinnati Observatory Outreach Astronomer Dean Regas said the meteors are about the size of a grain of sand and hit the earth's atmosphere at more than 100,000 miles per hour.  They reach 3,000 degrees fahrenheit, producing the flash of light you see. 

"The only trick is, you have to be up pretty early in the morning to see most of them, usually between 2 and 5 a.m., which is a little early for most folks," said Regas.

Cincinnati Observatory

The Cincinnati Observatory is celebrating an anniversary this weekend. It was 168 years ago that a prominent Cincinnatian made the city the "Birthplace of American Astronomy."

Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel must have been a pretty convincing guy. In the mid-1800s he went door to door to collect 25 dollar donations for a telescope and observatory. Cincinnati Observatory Outreach Astronomer Dean Regas tells the story.

The House of 'WOW!'

Jan 10, 2013

Dean Regas is the Outreach Astronomer for The Cincinnati Observatory in Mt. Lookout.  The observatory is home to, among other things, the oldest telescope in the United States which is still in use on a daily basis.


The Big Bang Theory

Nov 30, 2012

Dean Regas from the Cincinnati Observatory joins Cincinnati Edition as a monthly contributor, and his Looking Up segment makes a big bang this month as he talks with Bill Prady, co-creator of the monster CBS hit The Big Bang Theory. They discuss the science used in the show, the growth of the characters over the years, and the story behind Raj’s inability to speak to women.