UC Health

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Some lung cancer nodules are very small and undetectable until they grow larger, and that can signal a poor prognosis for the patient. Even if they are discovered at an early stage, finding them during surgery can be challening. But UC Health is seeing success detecting and marking the nodules with a procedure using radioactive material and a special probe that acts as a Geiger counter.

kidney cancer
Bruce Blaus Blausen.com staff/Medical gallery of Blausen Medical 2014

The American Cancer Society estimates 65,340 new cases of kidney cancer (42,680 in men and 22,660 in women) will occur this year. About 14,970 people (10,010 men and 4,960 women) will die from the disease. Kidney cancer is among the 10 most common cancers in both men and women.

cincinnati edition
Wikipedia

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows diseases transmitted through the bites of ticks, mosquitoes and fleas are a "growing public health problem" in the United States, with reported cases of what are called vector-borne diseases more than tripling nationwide since 2004.   

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Crackling sounds deep inside the brain signal normal communication among an estimated 100 billion neurons. But after a traumatic health event like a brain injury or a heart attack, the brain goes silent. If the patient isn't revived, a massive wave of electrochemical energy is released that gradually poisons the nerve cells.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

UC researchers have figured out a way to non-invasively peek inside the brain of a neurological intensive care patient to stop the deadliest form of stroke, an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). They say this is important because the person is often sedated, sometimes on a ventilator and cannot communicate.

Doctors Matthew Flaherty, Opeolu Adeoye, George Shaw and Joe Clark became frustrated that CT and MRI scans were the only option and couldn't be done repeatedly. Shaw tells the story.

Boot Camp For New Dads

Jun 7, 2017
Pixabay

When you bring home a new baby the first few months are a test of endurance and strength. It's almost as if you need a boot camp before you're ready for all that parenthood hurls at you. For new fathers, part of the challenge can be in figuring out how to provide support for mom. But fathers need support as well.

Grace Project

The loss of a woman's breasts to cancer can take an emotional and psychological toll and affect how she views herself as a woman. Photographer Charise Isis founded the Grace Project to empower women who have had mastectomies, creating portraits showing the strength and beauty of cancer survivors.

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UC Health/Mayfield Brain & Spine

University of Cincinnati researchers are looking deep inside the brain to figure out why some head injury patients recover and others do not.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

When Marilyn Cotter's doctor ordered a stress test after a bout of chest tightness the Delhi Township grandmother had a space-age option, the AlterG treadmill.

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It’'s not easy dealing with chronic pain, and medical professionals often resort to prescribing their patients opiates, which can become addictive and lead to more problems. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

As opioid abuse skyrockets out of control, University of Cincinnati Health researchers are trying to zero in on fresh alternatives for the estimated 100 million people who suffer from chronic pain.

Principal investigator of a $1.95 million federal grant, Jun-Ming Zhang, MD, is studying the roles of the  nervous system and immune system in preclinical models of back and neuropathic pain.

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People in Greater Cincinnati waiting for a heart transplant will no longer have to travel hundreds of miles.  After a nearly ten year hiatus, UC Health is again offering the surgery.  David Waits of Hillsboro received a new heart February 2nd.

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As Americans become more health-conscious, more physicians and patients are opening up to a whole-person approach of preventative and curative treatments. Integrative medicine combines conventional Western medicine with complementary therapies such as mindfulness, acupuncture, yoga and healthy eating to treat the person, not the disease.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Cigarette smoking kills more than 480,000 Americans each year.

Close to 800,000 Americans each year suffer a new or recurrent stroke, and while stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, there are nearly 7 million stroke survivors in the U.S.

  Thanks to high-definition cameras, monitors and advances in communications technology, and driven by a growing shortage of physicians, telehealth is quickly growing in use and popularity. It allows a patient to consult with a healthcare provider remotely instead of traveling to an office or clinic, and the costs involved are usually much less than a traditional office visit. Joining us to look at how telehealth is helping to change the practice of medicine are Dr. Debi Sampsel, chief officer of innovation and entrepreneurship at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing; Pam Kimmel, director of telehealth for UC Health; and, Megan Gresham, director of corporate communications with Maple Knoll Village.

  There are approximately 14.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. Once their treatment for cancer ends, many of these individuals find it difficult to make the transition to what becomes their new normal, where they must adjust to new feelings, new problems, and different ways of looking at the world. To help these survivors,  a new field of cancer care called cancer survivorship has evolved.

  

  

  Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men, with about one man in seven being diagnosed with the disease during his lifetime. Yet most men with prostate cancer don'’t die from it. Here to discuss the causes and treatments for prostate cancer, and the latest in available research, are, with the University of Cincinnati  Cancer Institute, Dr. Sadhna Verma, a UC Health radiologist, and Dr.

Dr. DiPaola / UC Health

Doctors say it is something in the air that's helping infertile couples conceive at West Chester Hospital. Ever since the installation of a high-tech air filtration system the UC Health Center for Reproductive Health has seen a 20% increase in fertility for in vitro fertilization.

Medical Director  Krystene DiPaola, MD, says the national average is 40%. In West Chester it's 60%.

 

  An estimated 1.7 million people sustain traumatic brain injuries each year in the United States, and more than 50,000 of those individuals die from their injuries. New research is being conducted to reduce the number of deaths and permanent disabilities caused by head trauma. Joining us to discuss one current clinical trial are University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Associate Professor of Surgery and trauma surgeon with UC Health, Dr.

 

  

  A 25-year study involving 90,000 Canadian women aged 40 to 59 found no benefit for women who were randomly assigned to have mammograms. It found death rates from breast cancer and from all causes were the same in women who got mammograms and those who did not. The study continues the controversy over the value of mammograms in detecting cancer. Dr.

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

This is what actor Christopher Reeve dreamed of... a bionic machine that helps paralyzed people walk. Drake Center is one of 20 facilities in the world to have an Exoskeleton. It is kind of like a backpack with leg and foot support. Therapists program the parameters and paraplegics can walk slowly. For 29 year old Kevin Moeller, who's been in a wheelchair ten years, it gives him new freedom and the ability to have his natural height of six foot. Ann Thompson reports in "Focus on Technology."