mental health

Alcohol The Most Abused Drug

Jan 12, 2014

  The local heroin crisis has rightfully received a lot of attention, but alcohol is still the most-abused drug in the U.S. It wrecks lives, devastates families, and is responsible for more than 4,300 deaths each year among those under the age of 21.

  Law enforcement and health professionals are calling heroin abuse in Greater Cincinnati an epidemic. The drug is cheap, easy to get, and its affects are devastating. But several agencies and individuals have joined forces to fight heroin use. Dr. Lynne Saddler, Northern Kentucky Health Department District director of Health, Senior Program Officer Ann Barnum with Interact for Health, and Dr.

American Pscyhological Association

It’s easy for a parent to tell when a child has a fever or stomach ache, but a mental health problem may be much harder to detect. Millions of children in the United States suffer from depression, anxiety, ADHD or a host of other mental health issues, but many go undiagnosed or properly treated. We discuss recognizing and treating mental health issues in children with Lindner Center of HOPE, Staff Psychiatrist Dr. Leah Casuto, Clinical Director of Psychiatry at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Dr. Michael Sorter, and Director of Mental Health for The Children's Home of Cincinnati, Debbie Gingrich.

The Christ Hospital

Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

Jul 16, 2013

Mental Health in Greater Cincinnati

Jul 2, 2013

Surveys show one in five people in the US suffers from some form of mental illness, and many of those mental health problems go undiagnosed. On today’s Cincinnati Edition we’ll be taking a look at mental health issues in Greater Cincinnati.

Mental health experts say psychological disorders usually emerge before a child enters high school, but only 25% of children with problems see trained professionals for treatment.

WVXU

Part of the President’s plan to reduce gun violence focuses on increased mental health services. Ann Thompson, in “Focus on Technology,” reports on Cincinnati efforts to be pro-active, involving a predictive spit test and photographing the brain.

 Dr. Jim Eliassen stands behinds glass at the University of Cincinnati Center for Imaging Research. 

While many eyes were focused on political races yesterday, school groups and social service agencies in the area were watching to see how their levies fared.

Hamilton County voters handily approved the mental health and senior services levies. Both were renewals but, because of lower property values, will actually raise fewer dollars.

School levies across the tri-state were less clear cut with many decisions separated by just several hundred votes.

Cincinnati Public's renewal passed as did levies in the Batavia, Finneytown, Northwest, Reading and Monroe districts.

Commissioners vote to keep levy rates flat

Aug 8, 2012
(photo by Tana Weingartner)

Renewal levies for Hamilton County senior services and mental health will stay at their current millage rates for a five-year period, meaning reduced funding for the agencies that rely on them.  Commissioners approved both levies today for November's ballot. 

Board president Greg Hartmann acknowledged it would be a challenge for levy recipients, but said it was important to hold the line on property taxes when many county homeowners were facing tough economic decisions. 

Commissioner Chris Monzel called it the right direction to go:

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