Cincinnati Recreation Commission

cincinnati recreation commission
Liz Dufour / Cincinnati Enquirer

Cincinnati's 23 recreation centers are a place to socialize, play and swim, but for the thousands of kids who visit them daily, they are so much more. Enquirer reporter Sharon Coolidge recently spent a week at the Price Hill Recreation Center on Hawthorn Avenue to see how the center is an oasis for the community.

hot weather
John Minchillo / AP

If there was any question about which season we are in, the next few days should prove educational. The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory and an excessive heat watch as temperatures and humidity climb.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Recreation officials say they need $94 million in the next six years just to repair and maintain current facilities.  

At the same time, the city's budget is expected to include only about $15 million for that work.  

Provided, Cincinnati Dragons

All children benefit from physical activity and the enjoyment that can come with sports and teamwork. But for those who are disabled, participating in these activities is a bit more challenging. Special needs or adapted sports programming give all kids, regardless of ability, the chance to engage in various forms of physical recreation.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The Cincinnati Recreation Commission is expanding hours at some rec centers to give teens more options. Interim director Steve Pacella says the pilot program will start with seven centers and provide targeted teen programming.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Cincinnati’s Law and Public Safety Committee has approved a new set of rules for the use of city swimming pools by children. Recreation officials say the rules will protect children without hindering their ability to learn to swim at an early age.