History

Provided

In 1961, during the Civil Rights Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality recruited volunteers for a series of bus rides. David Fankhauser, a 19-year-old student, boarded the bus to Jackson, Mississippi. There he and the other volunteers faced violence and imprisonment for protesting racial segregation at interstate bus terminals. Fankhauser was a Freedom Rider.

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Centuries ago American Indians constructed vast earthworks stretching for miles through Ohio. Some of these geometric and animal shaped structures were more than 15 feet high and rivaled Stonehenge in their astronomical accuracy. European settlers demolished many of the structures but some spectacular sites remain.

Pixabay

What happens in Vegas started in Newport, Kentucky. The city was known as "America's Playground" from the 1920's to the 1960's, a hotbed for a criminal underworld of casinos, brothels and mobsters. The Sin City of the south didn't last forever. With reform movements, the election of a new sheriff and an FBI raid ordered by U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Newport began to clean up its act.

Greg Hume

Once the home of influential anti-slavery author Harriet Beecher Stowe, the Stowe House in Walnut Hills is recognized as a site on the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.  Planning is underway for restoration work on the 184-year-old house located at the corner of Martin Luther King Drive and Gilbert Avenue.

Grave Robbers Rampant In 19th Century Cincinnati

Aug 1, 2017
Public Domain

An illicit body trade proliferated in 19th century Cincinnati, but this business wasn't in the red-light district, it was in local cemeteries. Medical schools in Ohio and nationwide needed cadavers for study but no laws allowed for body donation. Doctors turned to grave robbers to do the dirty work. Grave robbing was so rampant that inventors created unusual contraptions for protecting the dead. A high-profile case of body snatching finally led to legalized body donation in Ohio.

Celebrating Man O'War In Lexington

Jul 28, 2017

Man O'War: The Mostest Horse There Ever Was is the title of an exhibit at Lexington, Kentucky's International Museum of the Horse

The First Mission To The Moon

Jul 26, 2017
amazon.com

In August 1968, NASA made a bold decision to launch mankind’s first flight to the moon. Just the year before, three astronauts had burned to death in their spacecraft. Since then, the Apollo program had suffered one setback after another. President Kennedy's call to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade seemed destined to become an unfulfilled promise.

U.S. Soldiers Stationed In Europe

Jul 18, 2017
37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team

Note: The morning we spoke with Major General Gronski, full details of a U.S. military plane crash in Mississippi the night before had not yet been released. Fifteen Marines and a Navy Corpsman died in that crash.

Letters From A Soviet Prison

Jul 17, 2017
Provided

Francis Gary Powers was a CIA U-2 pilot shot down in 1960 while flying a reconnaissance mission over the Soviet Union. He was held in a Soviet prison for almost two years before being exchanged for a senior KGB agent who had been captured in the United States. The incident exposed America’s secret reconnaissance missions and President Eisenhower was forced to admit to aerial spying.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

Cincinnati City Council strikes a compromise on human services funding, Hamilton County Clerk of Courts offers employees wage hikes and paid family leave and Ohio begins its next fiscal year with a $65 billion budget.

Norwood Where Legends Were Born

Jul 13, 2017
Provided

On August 26, 1987, a red Camaro rolled off the assembly line at the General Motors Corporation plant in Norwood. It was the last car produced at the GM facility, which began manufacturing Chevrolets in 1923. 

amazon.com

Most of us today think of the Civil War in terms of clear and defined boundaries between the slave states of Kentucky and Missouri and the free states of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Kansas. But in his latest book, University of Cincinnati Professor Christopher Phillips explores the more ambiguous and fluid cultures and attitudes of what are referred to as the "Middle Border" states during the Civil War era.

The Strange And Exotic World Of Lafcadio Hearn

Jul 6, 2017
Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

The first westerner to translate Japanese stories into English was Patrick Lafcadio Hearn. Born in 1850 on the Greek island of Lefkada, and later abandoned by his parents, Hearn was sent to America. He made his way to Cincinnati and while here he wrote hundreds of articles, many of them for the Cincinnati Enquirer.

How To Preserve Your Family's Immigration Story

Jul 5, 2017
Provided

During the past year, a group of Xavier University faculty and staff dubbed the Mission Animators has been examining immigration, migration and refugees in our region. As part of the project the university is looking for documents and photographs you have that tell your history.

Bill Fultz

Most of us are familiar with Over-the-Rhine's history but what's below the surface? Cincinnati's underground beer tunnels, crypts and even privies have secrets to tell. The Over-the-Rhine Museum presents "Under-the-Rhine: Tales of Beer, Bones and Bathrooms." It's the latest installment in the lecture series "Three Acts in Over-the-Rhine," with expert speakers dedicated to preserving the neighborhood's history and heritage.

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Gordon Gray has held many foreign assignments during his career with the U.S. government, including serving as Ambassador to Tunisia from 2009 - 2012.

Off the Page is the title of a new exhibit at the Lloyd Library of the works of Maria Sibylla Merian who discovered the theory of metamorphoses 150 years before Darwin's Theory of Evolution. 

Wikimedia Commons

World War I began in Europe on July 28, 1914, but the United States did not enter the war until April 6, 1917. More than 17 million military personnel and civilians died, and another 20 million were wounded, in what was once known as "the war to end all wars." American deaths totaled more than 116,000.

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Robert Doolan was born in Cincinnati on the eve of the Unites States' entry into World War I, enlisted in the Army Air Corps in January 1941 and served as navigator on a B-17 bomber. His plane was shot down over Holland, he was captured and served 16 months as a German prisoner of war. 

Wikimedia Commons

Commentary: Our David Lewis talks about – and shares the music of – Cincinnati native, torch singer, Broadway phenom, and possibly the inventor of the strapless dress, Libby Holman.

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