History

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Finalized on November 21, 1995 at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the Dayton Peace Accords ended the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The war, which had lasted more than three years, cost 100,000 lives and drove 2 million people from their homes. Current and former world leaders are participating in events this week to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Peace Accords.

Provided, Over-the Rhine Museum

People may know Over-the-Rhine for its great restaurants and bars, but it has a history as rich as its exciting nightlife. The Over-the-Rhine Museum, slated to open in 2020 with a pop-up version available in 2016, will capture the community’'s extensive past with the help of local residents, historians, designers and business owners.

In his new book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis, Politico eHealth Editor Arthur Allen tells the true story of the battle against disease and genocidal ideology, told through the lives of microbiologists Rudolf Weigl and Ludwick Fleck, who fought typhus and cruelty from the Russian POW camps of WWI to the ghettos and concentration camps of Nazi-occupied Europe.

The three buildings on Fourth Street that were once home to high-end fashion retailer Gidding-Jenny after the two companies merged in 1962, and more recently to discount retailer T.J. Maxx, could soon have a new owner and a new life.

The Ohio River National Freedom Corridor is a cooperative initiative which works across the Tri-state to preserve, interpret and promote our extraordinary underground railroad heritage. In partnership with the Clermont County Convention and Visitors Bureau, the National Park Service Network to Freedom Program and the Ohio Humanities Council, the Ohio River National Freedom Corridor will host the inaugural 2015 Regional Underground Railroad Conference, October 16 through 18.

History In Your Own Backyard

Sep 28, 2015
Provided, History in Your Own Backyard

  From county courthouses to country stores, ghost towns to lost bridges, the Anderson Ferry to the Great Miami Railroad Bridge, Satolli Glassmeyer and his team are preserving the memories of the Tri-state through their project, History in Your Own Backyard. Their goal is to build a database of documentary videos featuring historic buildings, bridges, tunnels, and communities, throughout Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana. 

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation On Display

Sep 22, 2015

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.

How Ohio's Borders Were Decided

Sep 7, 2015

This interview originally aired July 6, 2015.

If you never learned it in school, or just don'’t remember it, how the land boundaries of Ohio were decided as it became a state is a fascinating story. Much of the area we now know as Ohio was once owned by Virginia, Connecticut, and several high-profile private owners, including George Washington.

Preserving Native American Culture At SunWatch

Aug 3, 2015

The Mission of SunWatch Indian Village/Archaeological Park, operated by The Dayton Society of Natural History, is to protect, preserve and research the cultural remains of the SunWatch National Historic Landmark archaeological site. The park also serves as a visitor and educational center for archaeology, Native American culture, and heritage stewardship as they relate to the site. 

President Jimmy Carter Reflects on A Full Life

Jul 14, 2015

  In his 90 years, former President Jimmy Carter has been a farmer, the 39th President of the United States, a Nobel Peace Prize winner and an international humanitarian. He talked with us about his experiences and his new book A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety.

Since its discovery in 1739, Big Bone Lick in Boone County has drawn the attention of naturalists and paleontologists from around the world. The first organized paleontological excavation in North America was conducted there in 1807.

Bill Rinehart/WVXU

Parker Academy once stood as a fully integrated schoolhouse in Clermont County in the 19th century, founded by abolitionist James Parker. A team of NKU students and professors went on an archeological dig at the site of the school.

  

Most people know, or think they know, the story of Wilbur and Orville Wright, the two bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio who taught the world to fly.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian David McCullough has just released his latest book, a fascinating look at the men from Dayton, Ohio who took flight from Kitty Hawk.

Richard O. Jones was a longtime writer for The Hamilton Journal-News, but he has now embarked on a new career as true crime historian.

Provided, Cincinnati Museum Center


Dreamers & Doers, Kentucky women in history

May 4, 2015

  “Dreamers & Doers: VOICES of Kentucky Women” is a film documentary inspired by the women in the Commonwealth who boldly opened doors in politics, science, education, entertainment, literature, athletics, religion and the military. Joining us to discuss film and the achievements of some of the more than 40 women portrayed in the documentary are Eleanor Jordan, executive director of the Kentucky Commission on Women; Dr.

Efraim Zuroff is director of the Simon Wiesenthal Centers Israel office & Eastern European Affairs division and coordinator for Nazi crimes research worldwide. In 2002 he launched Operation Last Chance, a public campaign to locate and bring to justice the worst suspected Nazi criminals before ill health or death spared them from potential punishment. Today Zuroff is considered the world’'s preeminent Nazi hunter. He and Sarah Weiss, executive director of The Center for Holocaust and Humanity Education join us to discuss finding justice, 70 years after the Holocaust. 

Native American artifact found in Newtown

Feb 27, 2015
Provided / Cincinnati Museum Center

The discovery of a rare Native American artifact in Newtown is exciting for archeologists, but it's also raising more questions. WVXU reporter Bill Rinehart joins us to provide details of the find.

National Park Service

At 2038 Auburn Avenue stands the two-story Greek Revival house where William Howard Taft was born and grew up. Now designated the William Howard Taft National Historic Site, it is the only memorial to the nation's 27th President and 10th Chief Justice. The site, consisting of the Taft House and Education Center, is managed by the U.S. Park Service. Park Ranger Kerry Wood tells us about the historic site and a bit about our 27th president.

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