Cincinnati Edition

Monday through Friday from noon to 1 p.m.
  • Hosted by Michael Monks

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from The Johnson Foundation, Dick Rosenthal, and The Maxwell C. Weaver Foundation, U.S. Bank Trustee.

prison
Pixabay

The Ohio Justice and Policy Center has made headlines advocating for the wrongfully convicted. But the legal team takes on many cases where its client's guilt is not in question.

fake news
Pixabay

In an era of fake news, a whole industry has sprung up to police the internet. These news rating agencies, or as Slate coins them, the "Trust Industry," promise to employ their teams of experts and algorithms to weed out falsehoods disguised as news content. One of the latest is NewsGuard, a browser plugin that assigns ratings for many of the internet's most trafficked sites.

Provided/Tenth Acre Farm

Many home gardeners have discovered that with the right crops and planting methods they can grow a lot of produce in a small amount of space. Which is extremely helpful for homeowners with small yards. And especially good news for those who live in urban areas or apartments, where container gardening is a necessity.

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Cincinnati City Council considers an ordinance that would mean someone within the city possessing 100 grams or less of marijuana could be cited for a misdemeanor, but would face no fines, no jail time and no court costs.

Cole Imperi
Courtesy of Cole Imperi

When do we start dying? For Cole Imperi there isn't one right answer, it's the kind of complex question she thinks about every day. Imperi is a duel-certified thanatologist and a death doula. Thanatology is the scientific study of death and dying.

hamilton county justice center
Ann Thompson / WVXU

The bail system is meant to ensure an individual appears in court after he or she is charged with a crime and to promote public safety. But some research shows requiring cash bail keeps many individuals locked up simply because they can't afford to pay, and that it does not make society safer.

esports
PiViP / Twitter

Three-hundred and eighty million people watched eSports in 2018, according to a report from market analytics company Newzoo, which offered details about the $1 billion burgeoning industry. The activity is so popular now that dozens of colleges have launched varsity eSports teams, some with scholarship opportunities, and it is now a sanctioned sport recognized by the Kentucky High School Athletic Association.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Kentucky holds its primary elections next Tuesday, May 21. Republicans and Democrats will choose their candidates for seven state executive offices: Governor; Lieutenant Governor; Attorney General; Secretary of State; Commissioner of Agriculture; Auditor; and, Treasurer. The general election takes place November 5.

verna williams
Courtesy of Verna Williams

The legal profession remains one of the least diverse fields according to University of Cincinnati College of Law Dean Verna Williams. And yet, Law.com finds the number of women and minorities stepping into top administrative positions at law colleges is on track to outpace the number of white men in those roles. Williams is one of them. She is the first African American and the second woman to lead the UC College of Law in its 180-year history.

floral avenue kentucky
Michael Monks / WVXU

There are plenty of examples indicating an urban renaissance in the historic core of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. But, like their more urban peers, the region’s first ring suburbs also experienced a decline in quality of life in the latter part of the 20th century, and were also impacted greatly by the Great Recession.

minority business
Pixabay

The income disparity between African Americans and whites in Cincinnati is vast. Only 18% of businesses are black-owned, according to the State of Black Cincinnati report – a jarring statistic for a city whose population is 43% black. In other areas, black Cincinnatians fall behind their white peers in education, employment and income. Now, through a number of initiatives, efforts are underway to increase access to early childhood education, job training and other support mechanisms in an attempt to level the playing field.

Some say, though, those efforts still aren't enough.

bond hill academy
Ann Thompson / WVXU

A 1999 tax abatement agreement between the City of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Public Schools is set to expire. Now the city and CPS are at odds over renegotiating the deal.

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Ohio’s Congressional map is likely headed to the U.S. Supreme Court, after a panel of federal judges ruled it's unconstitutionally gerrymandered to favor one political party over the other. The Ohio legislature considers an abortion bill more restrictive than the "Heartbeat Bill" Governor Mike DeWine signed just last month.

constanze stelzenmuller
Courtesy

Sometimes, events in the news can feel like a world away. However, as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) finds itself under strain as an institution, there are impacts on both the local peacekeeping and business communities.

bike trail
Pixabay

While the number of people in Greater Cincinnati who ride bicycles for recreation or for their daily commute is growing, our region still lacks a safe, well-connected system of biking trails and dedicated on-road bike lanes. Though there has been progress over the last decade to make our area more bike-friendly.

nora mcinenry
Courtesy of Brandon Werth

Nora McInerny gets recognized by strangers. People come up to her in the grocery store, or on the street. They know about her podcast or her books or her advice series. But they're not looking for a selfie with a semi-celeb. McInerny is a grief magnet. These brief interactions are filled with tragic stories strangers want to tell her. That's because she's been there. She's still there.

lloyd library through the rx bottle
Courtesy of The Lloyd Library

Ohio has joined 32 other states in legalizing marijuana for medical use. The plant has a long history in this country as a medicinal drug. The Lloyd Library and Museum explores that history in its current exhibit "Through the Rx Bottle." The exhibit, in collaboration with the Cannabis Museum of Athens, includes century-old botanical illustrations and pharmaceutical artifacts.

beer
Pixabay

Mike Morgan, founder and president of Queen City History & Education Ltd., curator of the Brewing Heritage Trail and author of Over-The-Rhine: When Beer Was King has just released his second book, Cincinnati Beer, which explores previously untold stories of our city's brewing history.

sober curious
Courtesy of Ruby Warrington

Whether it's a cocktail, pale ale or pinot, alcohol often pairs with social gatherings. Attend the symphony, visit the zoo, or even take a stroll through some parks in Cincinnati and you’ll find a vendor and a space for drinking.

dino martins
Courtesy of Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden

The next speaker in the 2019 Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden's Barrows Conservation Lecture Series is the Executive Director of the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya, Dino Martins, Ph.D.

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