Cincinnati Edition

Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 1:00 pm
  • Hosted by Dan Hurley

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from The Johnson Foundation, Dick Rosenthal, and The Maxwell C. Weaver Foundation, U.S. Bank Trustee.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Hamilton County commissioners rescind a sales tax increase under threat of a lawsuit. Now they have to find a way to address the county's structural deficit. Businesses at The Banks want to know when and where the proposed new riverfront music venue will be located. Cincinnati residents will be asked to approve at least four Charter amendments in November, and that number could grow. The City of Cincinnati continues to clear homeless camps out of downtown. And more changes are in store for local TV news operations.

dr. ashish vaidya
Courtesy Northern Kentucky University

Not afraid to take prudent risks. Northern Kentucky University's new president says to advance the school's mission, he's always looking for innovative ways to teach and engage.

Remembering Lost Northern Kentucky

Aug 2, 2018
lost northern kentucky
Courtesy Arcadia Publishing

Many of Northern Kentucky's historic businesses, religious structures, homes and entertainment destinations have been lost to time.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Last week the City of Cincinnati shutdown and fenced off an area near Paul Brown Stadium that had been the site of a homeless camp. Now, city officials are looking at options for how to respond to the homeless camps that remain along Third Street and another encampment underneath a highway overpass near U.S. Bank Arena.

Small Businesses, Big Changes In Walnut Hills

Aug 1, 2018
paramount theater
Courtesy GRCA

The Walnut Hills landscape is changing by the day. Vacant storefronts are taking shape as the next businesses that will bring energy and a tax base into the neighborhood. When Kroger pulled its grocery store out of the neighborhood in 2017, it was a significant blow to the community. Now, a grant will help open a new Peebles Corner Grocery at the site of the old store.

Preview Paddlefest 2018

Jul 31, 2018
paddlefest
Courtesy Paddlefest

The 17th Ohio River Paddlefest takes place this Saturday, August 4. Recognized as the largest paddling event in the United States, the 2018 Paddlefest will bring more than 2,000 people from 20-plus states to Cincinnati to celebrate the beauty and recreational benefits of the Ohio River.

cell phone
Pixabay

Ever receive a phone call from a number with the same area code and first three digits as your number, only to answer and find a telemarketer or recorded message on the other end of the line? A dubious congratulations to you: you’ve been the victim of spoofing.

How Dayton Is Revitalizing The Dayton Arcade

Jul 30, 2018
Courtesy of Carillon Historical Park

The Dayton Arcade, located in the center of downtown Dayton, Ohio's business district, opened as a farmers market in 1904. Retail businesses, restaurants and apartments were added later. For decades, the multi-building, 330,000-square foot Arcade was a major attraction for Dayton residents and tourists.

preschool promise
Ann Thompson / WVXU

There are more than 9,000 preschool-aged children living in Cincinnati and nearly half of them are at or below the poverty level. In 2016, voters passed a levy to help make quality preschool more affordable for families and to make more classroom seats available for children. Cincinnati Public Schools signed an agreement with the United Way of Greater Cincinnati and the non-profit organization Cincinnati Preschool Promise to allocate $15 million a year from the levy toward expanding access to quality preschool.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

SORTA decides not to put a tax levy on the November ballot although several members of the transit authority agree something must be done to fix a looming deficit for Metro. Cincinnati clears out a homeless camp downtown, but the city has no long-term solution to reducing the homeless population. And does an electric scooter rideshare business have a future in Cincinnati?

Another Troubling Week For Trump

Jul 26, 2018
donald trump
Alex Brandon / AP

The White House announces plans to strip security clearance from former national security officials because they've been critical of President Donald Trump over the Russia investigation. Federal prosecutors now have a tape of the president and his former attorney Michael Cohen discussing a payment to a woman who alleged she had an affair with Trump.  And Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

as one Aimee Sposito Martini
Courtesy Cincinnati Opera

A new production at the Cincinnati Opera explores the transgender experience and invites the public to join a series of panel discussions. In the contemporary chamber opera As One, a mezzo-soprano and a baritone performer both depict the role of Hannah, a transgender woman.

rumpke recycling facility
Emily Wendler / WVXU

China is a top global importer of many of the world's recyclable materials, but the country has begun banning dozens of these goods from several countries, including the United States. The move could mean the U.S. will have to ramp up its domestic recycling program.

The Right Way To Care For Your Trees

Jul 24, 2018
Pxhere.com

Trees not only add beauty and texture to your landscape, they provide shade for your home, reduce soil erosion and improve air quality. But the emerald ash borer and Asian longhorn beetle, along with other pests and diseases plus several seasons of near-draught conditions, have taken their toll on thousands of trees in our region.

winton road bus crash
Courtesy Cincinnati Police Department

The Cincinnati Police Department released a new traffic crash and enforcement report identifying peak hours for traffic accidents and the roads where crashes most often occur. There are 14 streets that make the list of worst areas for speeding and crashes that resulted in injuries or death. The peak time for fatal crashes were in the early morning hours of 2 a.m. to 3 a.m. The second worst time was between the hours of 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. when schools typically let out.

kids dental care
U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kimberly Spencer

This month, Interact for Health released results of a survey that asked local parents and caregivers to rate the oral health of their children. While 71 percent of survey respondents said their child's teeth were very good or excellent, lower-income caregivers were less likely to rate their child's dental health highly.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Ohio carries out its first execution of the year. Hamilton County Republicans submit a petition that could put an issue on the November ballot repealing an increase in the county sales tax. Cincinnati leaders attempt to balance helping the homeless with ensuring public safety. And could U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents increase their activity in Greater Cincinnati?

Pixabay

African-Americans have the highest mortality rate for all cancers combined. The disease is the second-leading cause of death among Native Americans over 45. Asian-Americans have the highest rates of liver and stomach cancers. While Hispanics and Latinos have lower incidence and death rates for most common cancers than whites, they are more likely to be diagnosed with advanced stages of disease.

sand tiger shark
Jeff Kubina / Wikimedia Commons

The 30th season of the Discovery Channel's Shark Week kicks off Sunday, July 22. The special programming event has consistently attracted a large audience. But Shark Week has been both praised and panned by scientists, who say while the series has raised the public's awareness of sharks, it also emphasizes shark attacks and often relies on pseudoscience to generate ratings.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

After a federal judge blocks work requirements for Medicaid patients in Kentucky, Governor Matt Bevin cuts dental and vision coverage for about 460,000 low-income Kentuckians on Medicaid. Another judge denies Bevin's request to amend a court ruling on the state's pension plan. And Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear announces he will run for governor in 2019.

The City of Cincinnati and downtown organizations propose a plan to reduce panhandling. And the Cincinnati Reds today look nothing like the team that took the field last April. What's going on?

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